1 Minute Read

The Top 10 Naturally Aspirated Engines

Posted by - Tim Earnshaw on 20 October 2021
Categories: Advice

At Windrush, we welcome plenty of turbo and supercharged vehicles to our prestige car storage facilities in London and the Cotswolds. But there’s still something about the classic naturally aspirated engine that casts a spell.

The fundamental principle remains unchanged: air intake to this engine type relies entirely on atmospheric pressure (unlike the forced induction of turbo and supercharging). And while naysayers will tell you the unwelcome upshot of N/A is a bulkier, fuel-thirstier engine, naturally aspirated vehicles typically offer bigger revs, better throttle response (with no turbo lag), optimal torque, easier maintenance and a healthy roar.

No wonder the N/A format is still in manufacturers’ thoughts – and has a healthy following amongst our long term car storage clients. Here’s ten of the best naturally aspirated engines, as chosen by our classic car storage team.    

Honda S2000

Honda S2000

An epic 2.0, 4-cylinder engine making 240 horsepower at an incredible 8,300 rpm. It revs and it roars and it screams… and all that power is right at the top of the revs, meaning you have to work the engine hard. But, it’s a Honda, so it takes it all day long and still comes back for more.

Lexus LFA

Lexus LFA

A very special 4.8 V10 built with help from Yamaha. While the Japanese may not have made many supercars, the V10 LFA creates a sonorous wail when on song, as only a V10 can. Not only is it a work of art, it also makes the LFA one of the fastest Japanese cars ever made with its 552 horsepower. 

Dodge Viper

Dodge Viper

What more can you say, an 8.4 V10 engine is more than enough in anyone’s book. With 640 horsepower, the all-aluminium engine creates an exhaust note that is unforgettable and while the car makes little sense, our classic car storage team applauds its very existence, every time a Viper rolls into our facilities.

Ferrari 550

Ferrari 550

A 485 horsepower 5.5 litre engine mated to an open-gate manual transmission is certainly something to savour. A front-engined Ferrari is always special, but with a V12 soundtrack and an all muscle, no turbo power delivery, the 550 is now regarded as one of the finest modern road cars out of Maranello.

BMW E46 M3 CSL

BMW E46 M3 CSL

The standard E46 M3 is also worthy of this list, but when BMW squeezed out 355 horsepower from a 3.2 litre naturally aspirated straight six, one can only nod with approval. Light enough to keep the M3 agile, but with a noise unique to an M3, it is one of the heroic engines of all time.

Porsche Carrera GT V10

Porsche Carrera GT V10

Porsche’s engineers designed and built the 980/01 V10 for F1 but didn’t use it as they pulled out before they had the chance. A detuned 604 horsepower version found its way into the glorious Carrera GT, a car that demands all of the driver’s attention, all of the time, and was as wild a road car as you could get.

Alfa Romeo 147GTA

Alfa Romeo 147GTA

The greatest 6-cylinder of all time? None look or sound as good as this, and none feel as special… or as fragile. With 250 horsepower the front-drive 147 GTA was a great place in which to fit the Busso V6. Arguably the most beautiful engine to be fitted to an attainable car.

McLaren F1

McLaren F1

The marvellous S70/2 V12 with its 6.1 litres, was the only V-12 made by BMW with four valves per cylinder. A gutsy 618 horsepower at 7,500 and 455 pound-feet of torque at 4,000 rpm was enough to propel the F1 from 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds.

Chevrolet LS1 V8

Chevrolet LS1 V8

Launched in 1997, it was rated at 345 horsepower at 5,600 rpm and 350 pound-feet of torque at 4,400 rpm, with power uprated to 350 horsepower in 2001. The LS V8 range is now a highly regarded ‘crate’ engine with great power, unrivalled reliability – and very tuneable too. A piece of American history. 

Ferrari 458 Speciale

Ferrari 458 Speciale

Ferrari put all their tech knowhow into this engine, and the result was 600 horsepower from a 4.5-litre, naturally aspirated V8, plus a flat-plane-crank that sounds like only a Ferrari can. Was it the last of the great V8s? In a world of turbos and hybrids, quite possibly, but what a way to go out.

Aston Martin Valkyrie

Aston Martin Valkyrie

Cosworth are the masters behind this soon-to-launch V12 NA engine. If all goes to plan, it will be the most powerful NA engine in history, producing a claimed 1130 horsepower from its 6.5 litres. Whether it launches with that output remains to be seen, but the naturally aspirated engine might not be over just yet…

Choose Windrush classic car storage, for turbo, supercharged & N/A engines

At Windrush, we treat every visitor to our prestige car storage facilities as an individual. Of course, some elements of our famous 12-step induction process are the same across the board, from the professional wash/dry your car will receive on arrival, to the climate-controlled environment and individual storage bays that mark out our long term car storage from our rivals.

But this is no ‘one size fits all’ service. With Windrush’s classic car storage experts on hand around the clock, we’ll adapt our ongoing maintenance programme to the specifications and demands of your vehicle, ensuring we cater to the quirks of the engine, mechanicals and more, and keep your car in an ‘always ready’ condition.

For details of our long term car storage, get in touch with the Windrush team on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk

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1 Minute Read

The 10 Best Bond Cars

Read Article
From the submersible Lotus Esprit to the endlessly iconic Aston Martin DB5, here are ten classic Bond vehicles…
Read Article
From the submersible Lotus Esprit to the endlessly iconic Aston Martin DB5, here are ten classic Bond vehicles that leave Windrush’s classic car storage team shaken and stirred… We welcome plenty of aspirational vehicles at Windrush. But nothing causes a buzz at our prestige car storage in London and the Cotswolds quite like the arrival of a Bond car. Ever since he revved a Sunbeam Alpine convertible around the film set of 1962’s Dr. No, 007’s automotive choices have always been impeccable, and although you’ll have to live without the Q-designed gadgetry, many are still available to buy today. Here, we salute ten of the very best Bond vehicles, for you to dream of, aspire to, invest in and safeguard with our long term car storage. 1964 Aston DB5 This icon of icons debuted in 1964’s Goldfinger, where it combined the sleekest of British engineering with an onboard arsenal that included oil slicks, smokescreens, a hubcap-mounted tyre slasher and machine guns hidden behind the indicator lights. Amazingly, at the time, the film company couldn’t afford to buy the DB5 outright, and special effects maestro John Stears had to beg the British builder to borrow it. 1977 Lotus Esprit Nicknamed ‘Wet Nellie’ on the set of 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me, the Esprit only reveals its secrets when Roger Moore’s Bond drives into the sea – causing the wheelarches to convert into fins while a periscope sprouts from the roof. Filmed in the Bahamas, the sequence required six different cars – including a full-scale model built by Perry Oceanographics from a bodyshell supplied by Lotus Of England, and a three-foot model that could be fully submerged. 1997 BMW 750iL Officially the world’s deadliest saloon, Q Branch outdid themselves on the V12 Beemer that stars in the audacious car park chase from 1997’s Tomorrow Never Dies. Pierce Brosnan’s secret agent could fire rockets from the sunroof, summon a chain-cutter from the bonnet and repel car-jackers with electric shocks, while spraying the bad guys with flash grenades, tear gas and metal spikes. All that, and it could even be controlled via his Ericsson mobile phone. 1981 Lotus Esprit Turbo It’s hard to top the aforementioned subaquatic Esprit, but 1981’s For Your Eyes Only introduced two further Lotus models with tricks up their sleeves. Look out for the sequence in which two thugs are detonated after smashing the ‘Burglar Protected’ glass, and also for Bond’s travels to Cortina in a stunner featuring interior design by Guigiaro of Italy. 1981 Citröen 2CV Also featured in For Your Eyes Only, the canary yellow 2CV falls into the ‘so uncool it’s cool’ category, livening up the chase scene with Gonzales’ thugs as it rolls around like an upended beetle. With the sequence supervised by Remy Julienne, the car proved so slow that the footage had to be sped up. 1999 BMW Z8 The perils of loaning 007 a high-performance sports car have never been made clearer than in 1999’s The World Is Not Enough. Titanium-bodied, V8-equipped and capable of 0-60 in five seconds, the Z8 even has a remote system than lets Bond start the engine and direct it to him. None of which saved it from being sawn in half by a buzzsaw suspended from a helicopter. 2006 Aston Martin DBS New Bond, new Aston, and as Daniel Craig took the reins for Casino Royale, the British marque’s latest V12-equipped model made its world debut. Even though 007 is forced to swerve off-road to avoid Eva Green’s love interest Vesper – rolling the dream machine and reducing it to a smouldering soup tin – it’s hard to imagine a better publicity campaign. 1967 Toyota 2000 GT convertible 1967’s You Only Live Twice is an odd one out amongst Bond films – the spy never actually takes the wheel himself. Luckily for autophiles, he’s rescued by secret service agent Aki in a stunning example of Japan’s first supercar, with ice-white finish and 2.0 6-cylinder engine. Two GTs were built for the filming: one is in a private collection, the other in Toyota’s Japanese museum. 2015 Jaguar C-X75 Why should Bond get all the hardware? In 2015, Spectre finally gave a villain the best vehicle, with Dave Bautista’s hulking Mr Hinx tearing a dark orange C-X75 through the streets of Rome. Sadly, the car never left the drawing board as a production model – although a prototype from the film did appear at auction in Abu Dhabi two years ago. 2002 Aston Martin Vanquish Purists were split over the ‘adaptive camouflage’ gadget that rendered Bond’s Die Another Day Aston invisible. But nobody could deny the Vanquish was a beauty, at once loud and brash, while also British and thorougly classy. The film car boasted a manual gearbox: an option that wasn’t offered to the public (they never got an ejector seat, either). Choose Windrush classic car storage – for Bond cars and beyond Whether you drive a Bond car or anything else, at Windrush, we’ve been expecting you. Our long term car storage is simply the best in the business, with two dedicated facilities in London and the Cotswolds that welcome your vehicle with a 12-step induction process, then keep it in peak condition with checkovers and maintenance programmes for the duration of your stay. We’d love to tell you more about our prestige car storage services. Drop the team a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk and discover how Windrush long term car storage gives you the movie star treatment.
where-londons-classics-and-supercars-hibernate-main-original-1.jpeg?w=1024&h=483&scale
3 Minute Read

A new generation of London car storage

Read Article
The capital is an increasingly risky place to leave supercars and classics unguarded on the streets. Read on…
Read Article
The capital is an increasingly risky place to leave supercars and classics unguarded on the streets. Read on to discover why Windrush’s central London location is safe as Fort Knox, and how our classic and supercar storage will return your vehicle to you even better than you left it.
the-best-v12-cars-of-all-time-main-original.jpeg?w=1024&h=682&scale
1 Minute Read

The Best V12 Cars Of All Time

Read Article
For over a century, the twelve-cylinder piston engine format has powered some of the greatest vehicles to grace…
Read Article
For over a century, the twelve-cylinder piston engine format has powered some of the greatest vehicles to grace Windrush’s classic car storage. Here are ten all-time favourites, picked by the team.   The V12 has history. Back in 1904, the world’s first twelve-cylinder piston engine – split into twin banks of six cylinders whose ‘V’ shape gave it the name – was originally designed for boat racing. Scan the annals since then and you’ll find the V12 powering everything from Panzer tanks and military trucks to diesel locomotives and World War II aircraft. But more than any of these, it’s the iconic automobiles featuring that classic engine configuration that have endured – and here at Windrush long term car storage, it’s our pleasure to keep them that way. Here are ten of the very best V12s, as chosen by our prestige car storage team.        McLaren F1 (1992) Think ‘supercar’ and the mental image that flashes up is still the legend unveiled at Monaco’s Sporting Club in May 1992. Gordon Murray’s concept and Peter Stevens’ body design were impeccable, but the mythology came from BMW Motorsport’s 6.1 V12, powering the McLaren to a production car world record of 240.1mph. Own one and you’re in good company, from Rowan Atkinson to Ralph Lauren. Pagani Zonda (1999) Founded by ex-Lamborghini engineer Horacio Pagani at the dawn of the ’90s, this Italian newcomer debuted in style with a supercar that went from underdog to object of desire overnight. Pagani’s famous attention to detail – and scholarly knowledge of composites – marked the Zonda out before you even turned the key, but the masterstroke was to include the 6.0 V12 from Mercedes-Benz AMG, nudging 400hp and ludicrously good fun. Lamborghini Miura Largely driven by his rivalry with Ferrari, Ferruccio Lamborghini hired the great Italian engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to dream up an engine that would pip the prancing horse, and from the late-’60s, his mid-mounted 3.9 V12 made the Miura look and move like an arrowhead on wheels. Perhaps Bizzarrini’s greatest triumph was his engine’s longevity: that V12 endured (with the occasional facelift) right through to the 2011 Lamborghini Murcielago.  Maserati MC12 As scarce as it gets – with just 50 road cars produced to homologate the 12 racers competing in the FIA GT Championship – the guts of the MC12 was the Ferrari F140 6.0 V12 (a derivative of which is in the Ferrari 812). It jumped off the mark like a scalded cat – 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds – topped out at 205mph, and is an occasional and very welcome guest at Windrush’s classic car storage.   Ferrari 812 Superfast The name wasn’t exactly subtle, but the Superfast lived up the billing. With a 6.5 V12 capable of 789hp and 9000rpm – with no turbocharging – there had never been a more powerful naturally aspirated production car engine when it debuted at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. In fact, that engine was so good that Top Gear considered the rest of the Superfast almost an afterthought: “The mightiest V12 of them all. With the rest of a car attached…”   Rolls Royce Phantom Unlike the go-faster brigade elsewhere in this countdown, the Phantom was as silent, stately and serene as the name suggested. But that effortless vibe belied the graft being done within by the 6.75 N73 BMW V12, taken from the E65 BMW 7-Series, but with increased capacity. A car that reminded us that luxury, class and sophistication were not mutually exclusive with raw power. Jaguar V12 While many V12 cars are untouchable icons that exist only in the pages of magazines, Jaguar’s classic twelve-cylinder is the one you’re most likely to have sampled, thanks to its inclusion in multiple production models through the ’70s and ’80s. Stick a pin in Jaguar’s production history and you’ll find it doing the business, from the vintage E-Type to the XJS and XJ of the ’80s, Jaguar’s engine was complex, silent, powerful and, perhaps above all, abundant, bringing the V12 to the driveways of everyday drivers. Ferrari 250 (1953) Pinin Farina’s undulating closed berlinetta bodywork delivered on the style, but it was Gioacchino Colombo’s 2933cc V12 that supplied the substance, mounted longitudinally in the front and capable of 237hp. Far more than a stopgap, the engine would go on to be fitted to various incarnations of the 250 including the GTO, California Spyder and GT SWB. Mercedes-Benz S600 (1991) Hard to believe given its proud history, but in 1991, the S600 represented Benz’s first toe into the V12 market. The newly designed 6.0-litre engine was the German marque’s first mass-produced twelve-cylinder for a passenger car, not to mention the most powerful MB engine to date, packing 408hp. Audi Q7 TDI 2008 was a vintage year for Audi, with the marque cheering Allan McNish to Le Mans victory in an R10, while readying a new Q7 whose V12 twin-turbo diesel posted an audacious 1000nm of torque and 493hp. Autocar described it as “the Q7 for those who struggle with the concept of self-constraint and have very deep pockets” – and it was meant as a compliment. Choose Windrush prestige car storage, for V12s and beyond At Windrush’s long term car storage, we know exactly how to treat your car, whether it’s a vintage V12 or a cherished modern classic. Read a little more about our prestige car storage programme, and you’ll be reassured that our state of the art facilities in London and the Cotswolds are exactly where your vehicle should be when it’s resting off the road. From the warm welome of our professional washing and drying regime, to the regular checkovers and maintenance regime that keep your vehicle in peak condition for the length of its stay, no other prestige car storage programme goes further. The Windrush team is ready to welcome you to our classic car storage in London and the Cotswolds. To learn more, drop us a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
  • the-10-best-bond-cars-main-original-1.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The 10 Best Bond Cars

    Read Article
    From the submersible Lotus Esprit to the endlessly iconic Aston Martin DB5, here are ten classic Bond vehicles that leave Windrush’s classic car storage team shaken and stirred… We welcome plenty of aspirational vehicles at Windrush. But nothing causes a buzz at our prestige car storage in London and the Cotswolds quite like the arrival of a Bond car. Ever since he revved a Sunbeam Alpine convertible around the film set of 1962’s Dr. No, 007’s automotive choices have always been impeccable, and although you’ll have to live without the Q-designed gadgetry, many are still available to buy today. Here, we salute ten of the very best Bond vehicles, for you to dream of, aspire to, invest in and safeguard with our long term car storage. 1964 Aston DB5 This icon of icons debuted in 1964’s Goldfinger, where it combined the sleekest of British engineering with an onboard arsenal that included oil slicks, smokescreens, a hubcap-mounted tyre slasher and machine guns hidden behind the indicator lights. Amazingly, at the time, the film company couldn’t afford to buy the DB5 outright, and special effects maestro John Stears had to beg the British builder to borrow it. 1977 Lotus Esprit Nicknamed ‘Wet Nellie’ on the set of 1977’s The Spy Who Loved Me, the Esprit only reveals its secrets when Roger Moore’s Bond drives into the sea – causing the wheelarches to convert into fins while a periscope sprouts from the roof. Filmed in the Bahamas, the sequence required six different cars – including a full-scale model built by Perry Oceanographics from a bodyshell supplied by Lotus Of England, and a three-foot model that could be fully submerged. 1997 BMW 750iL Officially the world’s deadliest saloon, Q Branch outdid themselves on the V12 Beemer that stars in the audacious car park chase from 1997’s Tomorrow Never Dies. Pierce Brosnan’s secret agent could fire rockets from the sunroof, summon a chain-cutter from the bonnet and repel car-jackers with electric shocks, while spraying the bad guys with flash grenades, tear gas and metal spikes. All that, and it could even be controlled via his Ericsson mobile phone. 1981 Lotus Esprit Turbo It’s hard to top the aforementioned subaquatic Esprit, but 1981’s For Your Eyes Only introduced two further Lotus models with tricks up their sleeves. Look out for the sequence in which two thugs are detonated after smashing the ‘Burglar Protected’ glass, and also for Bond’s travels to Cortina in a stunner featuring interior design by Guigiaro of Italy. 1981 Citröen 2CV Also featured in For Your Eyes Only, the canary yellow 2CV falls into the ‘so uncool it’s cool’ category, livening up the chase scene with Gonzales’ thugs as it rolls around like an upended beetle. With the sequence supervised by Remy Julienne, the car proved so slow that the footage had to be sped up. 1999 BMW Z8 The perils of loaning 007 a high-performance sports car have never been made clearer than in 1999’s The World Is Not Enough. Titanium-bodied, V8-equipped and capable of 0-60 in five seconds, the Z8 even has a remote system than lets Bond start the engine and direct it to him. None of which saved it from being sawn in half by a buzzsaw suspended from a helicopter. 2006 Aston Martin DBS New Bond, new Aston, and as Daniel Craig took the reins for Casino Royale, the British marque’s latest V12-equipped model made its world debut. Even though 007 is forced to swerve off-road to avoid Eva Green’s love interest Vesper – rolling the dream machine and reducing it to a smouldering soup tin – it’s hard to imagine a better publicity campaign. 1967 Toyota 2000 GT convertible 1967’s You Only Live Twice is an odd one out amongst Bond films – the spy never actually takes the wheel himself. Luckily for autophiles, he’s rescued by secret service agent Aki in a stunning example of Japan’s first supercar, with ice-white finish and 2.0 6-cylinder engine. Two GTs were built for the filming: one is in a private collection, the other in Toyota’s Japanese museum. 2015 Jaguar C-X75 Why should Bond get all the hardware? In 2015, Spectre finally gave a villain the best vehicle, with Dave Bautista’s hulking Mr Hinx tearing a dark orange C-X75 through the streets of Rome. Sadly, the car never left the drawing board as a production model – although a prototype from the film did appear at auction in Abu Dhabi two years ago. 2002 Aston Martin Vanquish Purists were split over the ‘adaptive camouflage’ gadget that rendered Bond’s Die Another Day Aston invisible. But nobody could deny the Vanquish was a beauty, at once loud and brash, while also British and thorougly classy. The film car boasted a manual gearbox: an option that wasn’t offered to the public (they never got an ejector seat, either). Choose Windrush classic car storage – for Bond cars and beyond Whether you drive a Bond car or anything else, at Windrush, we’ve been expecting you. Our long term car storage is simply the best in the business, with two dedicated facilities in London and the Cotswolds that welcome your vehicle with a 12-step induction process, then keep it in peak condition with checkovers and maintenance programmes for the duration of your stay. We’d love to tell you more about our prestige car storage services. Drop the team a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk and discover how Windrush long term car storage gives you the movie star treatment.
  • where-londons-classics-and-supercars-hibernate-main-original-1.jpeg?w=1024&h=483&scale
    3 Minute Read

    A new generation of London car storage

    Read Article
    The capital is an increasingly risky place to leave supercars and classics unguarded on the streets. Read on to discover why Windrush’s central London location is safe as Fort Knox, and how our classic and supercar storage will return your vehicle to you even better than you left it.
  • the-best-v12-cars-of-all-time-main-original.jpeg?w=1024&h=682&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The Best V12 Cars Of All Time

    Read Article
    For over a century, the twelve-cylinder piston engine format has powered some of the greatest vehicles to grace Windrush’s classic car storage. Here are ten all-time favourites, picked by the team.   The V12 has history. Back in 1904, the world’s first twelve-cylinder piston engine – split into twin banks of six cylinders whose ‘V’ shape gave it the name – was originally designed for boat racing. Scan the annals since then and you’ll find the V12 powering everything from Panzer tanks and military trucks to diesel locomotives and World War II aircraft. But more than any of these, it’s the iconic automobiles featuring that classic engine configuration that have endured – and here at Windrush long term car storage, it’s our pleasure to keep them that way. Here are ten of the very best V12s, as chosen by our prestige car storage team.        McLaren F1 (1992) Think ‘supercar’ and the mental image that flashes up is still the legend unveiled at Monaco’s Sporting Club in May 1992. Gordon Murray’s concept and Peter Stevens’ body design were impeccable, but the mythology came from BMW Motorsport’s 6.1 V12, powering the McLaren to a production car world record of 240.1mph. Own one and you’re in good company, from Rowan Atkinson to Ralph Lauren. Pagani Zonda (1999) Founded by ex-Lamborghini engineer Horacio Pagani at the dawn of the ’90s, this Italian newcomer debuted in style with a supercar that went from underdog to object of desire overnight. Pagani’s famous attention to detail – and scholarly knowledge of composites – marked the Zonda out before you even turned the key, but the masterstroke was to include the 6.0 V12 from Mercedes-Benz AMG, nudging 400hp and ludicrously good fun. Lamborghini Miura Largely driven by his rivalry with Ferrari, Ferruccio Lamborghini hired the great Italian engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to dream up an engine that would pip the prancing horse, and from the late-’60s, his mid-mounted 3.9 V12 made the Miura look and move like an arrowhead on wheels. Perhaps Bizzarrini’s greatest triumph was his engine’s longevity: that V12 endured (with the occasional facelift) right through to the 2011 Lamborghini Murcielago.  Maserati MC12 As scarce as it gets – with just 50 road cars produced to homologate the 12 racers competing in the FIA GT Championship – the guts of the MC12 was the Ferrari F140 6.0 V12 (a derivative of which is in the Ferrari 812). It jumped off the mark like a scalded cat – 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds – topped out at 205mph, and is an occasional and very welcome guest at Windrush’s classic car storage.   Ferrari 812 Superfast The name wasn’t exactly subtle, but the Superfast lived up the billing. With a 6.5 V12 capable of 789hp and 9000rpm – with no turbocharging – there had never been a more powerful naturally aspirated production car engine when it debuted at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. In fact, that engine was so good that Top Gear considered the rest of the Superfast almost an afterthought: “The mightiest V12 of them all. With the rest of a car attached…”   Rolls Royce Phantom Unlike the go-faster brigade elsewhere in this countdown, the Phantom was as silent, stately and serene as the name suggested. But that effortless vibe belied the graft being done within by the 6.75 N73 BMW V12, taken from the E65 BMW 7-Series, but with increased capacity. A car that reminded us that luxury, class and sophistication were not mutually exclusive with raw power. Jaguar V12 While many V12 cars are untouchable icons that exist only in the pages of magazines, Jaguar’s classic twelve-cylinder is the one you’re most likely to have sampled, thanks to its inclusion in multiple production models through the ’70s and ’80s. Stick a pin in Jaguar’s production history and you’ll find it doing the business, from the vintage E-Type to the XJS and XJ of the ’80s, Jaguar’s engine was complex, silent, powerful and, perhaps above all, abundant, bringing the V12 to the driveways of everyday drivers. Ferrari 250 (1953) Pinin Farina’s undulating closed berlinetta bodywork delivered on the style, but it was Gioacchino Colombo’s 2933cc V12 that supplied the substance, mounted longitudinally in the front and capable of 237hp. Far more than a stopgap, the engine would go on to be fitted to various incarnations of the 250 including the GTO, California Spyder and GT SWB. Mercedes-Benz S600 (1991) Hard to believe given its proud history, but in 1991, the S600 represented Benz’s first toe into the V12 market. The newly designed 6.0-litre engine was the German marque’s first mass-produced twelve-cylinder for a passenger car, not to mention the most powerful MB engine to date, packing 408hp. Audi Q7 TDI 2008 was a vintage year for Audi, with the marque cheering Allan McNish to Le Mans victory in an R10, while readying a new Q7 whose V12 twin-turbo diesel posted an audacious 1000nm of torque and 493hp. Autocar described it as “the Q7 for those who struggle with the concept of self-constraint and have very deep pockets” – and it was meant as a compliment. Choose Windrush prestige car storage, for V12s and beyond At Windrush’s long term car storage, we know exactly how to treat your car, whether it’s a vintage V12 or a cherished modern classic. Read a little more about our prestige car storage programme, and you’ll be reassured that our state of the art facilities in London and the Cotswolds are exactly where your vehicle should be when it’s resting off the road. From the warm welome of our professional washing and drying regime, to the regular checkovers and maintenance regime that keep your vehicle in peak condition for the length of its stay, no other prestige car storage programme goes further. The Windrush team is ready to welcome you to our classic car storage in London and the Cotswolds. To learn more, drop us a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
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