Cotswold Car Storage

Nestled safely away
in the heart of the Cotswolds

Purpose built, highly-secure and anonymous location

As featured in ...
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Why Choose Windrush Car Storage

Every vehicle is looked after as if our own

Our private facility is high security, anonymous and climate controlled. Full time staffed

location

Cotswold facility location & enquiries

Price for Cotswolds (GL54)
£89
+VAT per week
GL54 Cotswolds Google maps
(Please contact us for our site address and to make an appointment)
Opening hours
Monday - Friday
0800 - 1700
Saturday
0800 - 1200
Sunday
Drop off only
All visits by booked appointment please.
24/7 out of hours service available upon request.
We don’t reveal our exact location, for the added security that provides, but please take a look at the map below for our general location. Only after you have filled in our booking form will you be provided with our full address.

what’s included?

We believe in an all-inclusive price - with no surprises

High security
  • Site locations extremely discreet, no addresses listed
  • No external signage
  • High grade physical locks and bollards
  • Modern electronic security, regularly maintained and remotely monitored 24/7/365
  • All security measures reviewed regularly
Climate controlled
  • Dehumidified to 55% RH (relative humidity), the perfect environment for vehicle preservation
  • At 55% RH exposed metal will not rust, but not too dry that leather or tyres will dry out
  • Temperature and humidity automatically logged every hour 24/7/365
  • We can preserve any vehicle for any duration of time
  • We do not offer non-dehumidified storage as we know vehicles will degrade in this environment
ALL valeting
  • All vehicles entering Windrush for the first time and repeated after each use
  • pH neutral products to cleanse each vehicle carefully and thoroughly prior to storage
  • Pre handover final presentation preparation and checks
  • Highly experienced in all paint types & PPF care
CTEK battery conditioner
  • Supplied by Windrush
  • Annually electrically tested & certified for safety
  • Dedicated to each vehicle
Soft breathable cover
  • Windrush supplied
  • Super soft, stretchable and breathable
  • Suitable for all paint types
  • Carefully and methodically applied / removed to minimise any contamination
Full time staffed
  • Full time office staff ready to answer your email or call at any time
  • All emails responded to within 24hrs
  • We act as your car PA, whatever the question... the answer is yes
  • Highly trained, experienced, and knowledgeable staff
  • Positive, can-do attitude
  • A team who are passionate and genuinely care
Active maintenance
  • Daily walk around checks of all facilities to check security and environment
  • Weekly battery conditioner health checks of every vehicle
  • Bi-monthly run up to temperature
  • Any aspect taken care of at your request
  • Proactive storage so that every vehicle is always 'on the button' whenever you would like to next use
  • One level of service, no compromise, only the best
5 star customer service
  • 24/7/365 access to your vehicle
  • We are passionate about communication
  • Traditional values, modern approach
  • We care for your vehicle as if it was our own
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Services
Car storage services
We happily take care of any servicing, MOT, Installations, repairs and restorations needs for your car. Routine servicing, preventative maintenance and more
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Testimonials

You're In good company

  • testimonial1
    "We have kept our vehicle with Windrush for several years now and throughout we have been extremely impressed by their professionalism."

    Mrs A.M.
    Location: Pall Mall, London
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    I would recommend Tim and the Windrush team as being enthusiastic, professional, and accommodating, in providing value-for money car storage and care.

    Mr P.H.
    Location: London
Frequently asked questions
  • Where are we located?

    Our Google Map listings provide approximate locations however to safeguard the vehicles entrusted to us we do not publish our exact address or location. Please contact us with your enquiry for further information and to make an appointment to book a private tour. Thank you for your understanding.

  • How easily can I access my car and on how much notice?

    We aim to offer our client access to their vehicles on a 24/7 basis and our facility is open 7 days a week, with access out of hours using our secure Drop Zone.  We generally ask that clients give us 24 hours’ notice when using their vehicles but we can usually accommodate shorter notice requests where needed. The aim is to allow the clients to enjoy their vehicles whenever they need, fitting seamlessly around their busy lives.

  • Can we complete servicing, repairs and MOTs while cars are in storage?

    We aim to act as a “car butler” for our clients, no matter what their request. As such, we can assist our clients with the full range of ancillary services relating to their vehicles, be that routine maintenance, repairs, MOTs, transport etc.  We act as a single point of contact and the client can rely on us to get the work completed promptly and efficiently, keeping them fully informed at all stages to completion.

  • Can we provide transport services?

    As part of our concierge services, we can arrange transport services at competitive rates to/from any given destination worldwide, either using our fully trained drivers for local journeys or our enclosed transporter for longer distances (or situations where a client prefers covered transport).

  • Can we refurbish damaged alloy wheels?

    This is a common request where clients drive regularly in London and we are happy to arrange repairs to all finishes of alloy wheel using our preferred supplier. In most cases, the vehicle will not have to leave our facility to have the work completed.

  • Can clients leave their daily drivers with us when using their cars from storage?

    Once a client has placed a car with us, that space is theirs to use as they see fit and we will very happily look after a daily driver to our usual high standards while their storage car is being used.

  • Can we arrange importation and re-registration of vehicles from overseas?

    We have a great deal of experience of importing client cars and have various preferred partners who can arrange this. We are also very happy to deal with all aspects of the UK re-registration of foreign vehicles on behalf of the client, liaising directly with the importers and DVLA/HMRC.

  • Can we move cars between London and Cotswolds sites if needed?

    Yes, we are happy to move cars between sites, particularly if a client doesn’t need their car in London for a period of time and would prefer to take advantage of a lower storage rate. We use our in-house car transporter to make the relocation seamless and hassle-free.

News & Advice

Windrush in the news

the-best-v12-cars-of-all-time-main-original.jpeg?w=1024&h=682&scale
1 Minute Read

The Best V12 Cars Of All Time

Read Article
For over a century, the twelve-cylinder piston engine format has powered some of the greatest vehicles to grace…
Read Article
For over a century, the twelve-cylinder piston engine format has powered some of the greatest vehicles to grace Windrush’s classic car storage. Here are ten all-time favourites, picked by the team.   The V12 has history. Back in 1904, the world’s first twelve-cylinder piston engine – split into twin banks of six cylinders whose ‘V’ shape gave it the name – was originally designed for boat racing. Scan the annals since then and you’ll find the V12 powering everything from Panzer tanks and military trucks to diesel locomotives and World War II aircraft. But more than any of these, it’s the iconic automobiles featuring that classic engine configuration that have endured – and here at Windrush long term car storage, it’s our pleasure to keep them that way. Here are ten of the very best V12s, as chosen by our prestige car storage team.        McLaren F1 (1992) Think ‘supercar’ and the mental image that flashes up is still the legend unveiled at Monaco’s Sporting Club in May 1992. Gordon Murray’s concept and Peter Stevens’ body design were impeccable, but the mythology came from BMW Motorsport’s 6.1 V12, powering the McLaren to a production car world record of 240.1mph. Own one and you’re in good company, from Rowan Atkinson to Ralph Lauren. Pagani Zonda (1999) Founded by ex-Lamborghini engineer Horacio Pagani at the dawn of the ’90s, this Italian newcomer debuted in style with a supercar that went from underdog to object of desire overnight. Pagani’s famous attention to detail – and scholarly knowledge of composites – marked the Zonda out before you even turned the key, but the masterstroke was to include the 6.0 V12 from Mercedes-Benz AMG, nudging 400hp and ludicrously good fun. Lamborghini Miura Largely driven by his rivalry with Ferrari, Ferruccio Lamborghini hired the great Italian engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to dream up an engine that would pip the prancing horse, and from the late-’60s, his mid-mounted 3.9 V12 made the Miura look and move like an arrowhead on wheels. Perhaps Bizzarrini’s greatest triumph was his engine’s longevity: that V12 endured (with the occasional facelift) right through to the 2011 Lamborghini Murcielago.  Maserati MC12 As scarce as it gets – with just 50 road cars produced to homologate the 12 racers competing in the FIA GT Championship – the guts of the MC12 was the Ferrari F140 6.0 V12 (a derivative of which is in the Ferrari 812). It jumped off the mark like a scalded cat – 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds – topped out at 205mph, and is an occasional and very welcome guest at Windrush’s classic car storage.   Ferrari 812 Superfast The name wasn’t exactly subtle, but the Superfast lived up the billing. With a 6.5 V12 capable of 789hp and 9000rpm – with no turbocharging – there had never been a more powerful naturally aspirated production car engine when it debuted at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. In fact, that engine was so good that Top Gear considered the rest of the Superfast almost an afterthought: “The mightiest V12 of them all. With the rest of a car attached…”   Rolls Royce Phantom Unlike the go-faster brigade elsewhere in this countdown, the Phantom was as silent, stately and serene as the name suggested. But that effortless vibe belied the graft being done within by the 6.75 N73 BMW V12, taken from the E65 BMW 7-Series, but with increased capacity. A car that reminded us that luxury, class and sophistication were not mutually exclusive with raw power. Jaguar V12 While many V12 cars are untouchable icons that exist only in the pages of magazines, Jaguar’s classic twelve-cylinder is the one you’re most likely to have sampled, thanks to its inclusion in multiple production models through the ’70s and ’80s. Stick a pin in Jaguar’s production history and you’ll find it doing the business, from the vintage E-Type to the XJS and XJ of the ’80s, Jaguar’s engine was complex, silent, powerful and, perhaps above all, abundant, bringing the V12 to the driveways of everyday drivers. Ferrari 250 (1953) Pinin Farina’s undulating closed berlinetta bodywork delivered on the style, but it was Gioacchino Colombo’s 2933cc V12 that supplied the substance, mounted longitudinally in the front and capable of 237hp. Far more than a stopgap, the engine would go on to be fitted to various incarnations of the 250 including the GTO, California Spyder and GT SWB. Mercedes-Benz S600 (1991) Hard to believe given its proud history, but in 1991, the S600 represented Benz’s first toe into the V12 market. The newly designed 6.0-litre engine was the German marque’s first mass-produced twelve-cylinder for a passenger car, not to mention the most powerful MB engine to date, packing 408hp. Audi Q7 TDI 2008 was a vintage year for Audi, with the marque cheering Allan McNish to Le Mans victory in an R10, while readying a new Q7 whose V12 twin-turbo diesel posted an audacious 1000nm of torque and 493hp. Autocar described it as “the Q7 for those who struggle with the concept of self-constraint and have very deep pockets” – and it was meant as a compliment. Choose Windrush prestige car storage, for V12s and beyond At Windrush’s long term car storage, we know exactly how to treat your car, whether it’s a vintage V12 or a cherished modern classic. Read a little more about our prestige car storage programme, and you’ll be reassured that our state of the art facilities in London and the Cotswolds are exactly where your vehicle should be when it’s resting off the road. From the warm welome of our professional washing and drying regime, to the regular checkovers and maintenance regime that keep your vehicle in peak condition for the length of its stay, no other prestige car storage programme goes further. The Windrush team is ready to welcome you to our classic car storage in London and the Cotswolds. To learn more, drop us a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
what-does-windrushs-iso-9001-status-mean-for-you-main-original.png?w=1024&h=576&scale
1 Minute Read

What does Windrush’s ISO 9001 status mean…

Read Article
At Windrush, we thrive on providing the best prestige car storage, and continually strive to be better. Our…
Read Article
At Windrush, we thrive on providing the best prestige car storage, and continually strive to be better. Our approach has enabled us to qualify for the highly regarded ISO9001 certified status – but what does that mean for our clients? Classic car storage, in town and country Established by Tim Earnshaw in 2004, Windrush operates two long term car storage centres: a secure, secretive storage facility situated underneath the streets of Central London and an expansive headquarters hidden from view within beautiful Cotswolds countryside. Both are renowned for offering unrivalled care and attention to detail for fastidious owners of all types of vehicle. A superior service, recognised by ISO status Since our launch, the Windrush classic car storage team has continually improved and enhanced our service levels, earning highly coveted ISO9001 certification in the process. ISO status is awarded on a number of quality management principles including strong customer focus, motivation and implication of top management, a process-driven approach and continual business improvement. ISO 9001 sets out strict measures for the quality management systems in place within an organisation. To remain certified, every member company has to prove and display a continually developing business which meets the expectations required to maintain ISO membership. Using ISO 9001 processes ensures Windrush customers receive consistent, good-quality products and services while helping our management team to promote continual internal development and service level enhancements. Prestige car storage, always going the extra mile At Windrush we never rest on our laurels, a fact that has earned our leading reputation in the classic car storage sector. Our clients already understand the levels we go to, but for those who would like to know more, we have detailed our meticulous processes here. Meanwhile, if you’re considering entrusting your vehicle to our long term car storage facilities, you may like to download our latest client PDF brochure. The entire Windrush team are proud to be the best, and assure our clients, present and future, that we will always seek new ways to improve our long term car storage service to stay well ahead of the rest. Windrush’s team is ready to talk you through our long term car storage service. Get in touch on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk    
the-top-10-cars-of-the-90s-main-original.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
1 Minute Read

The Top 10 Cars Of The ’90s

Read Article
Of course, there’s an undeniable charm to a puttering vintage classic. But with automotive technology taking quantum leaps…
Read Article
Of course, there’s an undeniable charm to a puttering vintage classic. But with automotive technology taking quantum leaps every decade, the ’90s gave us some of the fastest and most finessed models in living memory. Whether you prefer your cars mouthier than a Gallagher brother or sleeker than a supermodel, here are ten modern classics, chosen by the Windrush prestige car storage team, that prove they do make ’em like they used to.           1992 Ford Escort Cosworth Top speed: 147mph, BHP: 224, 0-60: 5.7 A homologation special of the, otherwise lacklustre, fifth generation Ford Escort that competed in the World Rally Championship between 1993 and 1998, this winged weapon was available as a road car from 1992 until 1996 and caused quite a stir. Wide arches, big wings and large turbos made the car wonderfully anti-social; not surprisingly one of its biggest fans was Jeremy Clarkson, who bought one after testing it for Top Gear. 1990 Lamborghini Diablo Top speed: 202mph, BHP: 485, 0-60: 4.5  The Diablo concept started in 1985 and was intended as a replacement for the Countach, with the brief stating that the new car had to have a top speed of at least 315kph (196mph). When Chrysler Corporation bought Lamborghini they softened the original Marcello Gandini design, which infuriated the designer – still, the Diablo launched with a mid-mounted 5.7 V12 and rear wheel drive, becoming an instant icon.  1992 Jaguar XJ220 Top speed: 212.3mph, BHP: 542, 0-60: 4.2 Initial disappointment with the XJ220 has been well-documented. Initially shown as a V12 four-wheel-drive concept, the car was significantly changed when officially launched: 4WD became 2WD and V12 became a turbocharged V6. As a result, an initial order book of 1500 translated into sales of just 275 – though the recession of the ’90s didn’t help matters. Despite this, the XJ220 is now regarded as supercar royalty, its rarity adding to the appeal. And hey, V6 or not, those looks and 212 mph performance make it the stuff of legend.  1998 McLaren F1 Top Speed: 240.1mph, BHP: 627, 0-60: 3.2 The supercar benchmark and still the king, with a spec that included three seats (centre forward for the driver), gullwing doors, gold-plated engine bay and 240 mph. The brainchild of Gordon Murray, the F1 packed a motorsport-derived BMW V12 engine, though (unusually for McLaren at the time), it was designed purely as a road car, and its subsequent success on the track was an added bonus. Exotic construction made up of carbon-fibre, titanium, gold, magnesium and kevlar made for a remarkably light (1138kg) supercar that remains unsurpassed today, and the F1 is still an occasional guest at Windrush’s long term car storage. 1996 Lotus Elise Top Speed: 126mph, BHP: 118, 0-60: 5.8 The Elise may not be the most powerful car to come out of Norfolk, but it was one of the finest-handling cars of modern times. Weighing in at just 725kg the Series 1 Elise was capable of reaching 60mph in just 5.8 seconds, despite having just 118bhp. Designed by Julian Thomson, then Head of Design at Lotus, and Chief Engineer Richard Rackham, the Elise was built for driving with a low centre of gravity, few frills and a raw edge that was an instant success with buyers and headed a turn of fortune at Lotus. So good was the Elise, it has only just stopped production – though the car has seen numerous revisions over the years.  1994 Subaru Impreza Turbo Top Speed 143mph, BHP: 237, 0-60: 6.6 Subaru was, in the UK at least, the favoured wheels of farmers and rural dwellers who needed a rugged, dependable 4WD vehicle. But that all changed in 1994 when the Japanese manufacturer unveiled a turbo variant of their none-too-special Impreza saloon: one year later, Colin McRae would win the 1996 WRC Championship driving a version of the same car. The Impreza WRX offered sports car performance in a family saloon, becoming an instant hit with UK buyers with many cars being modified to very high power outputs. Today, an unmolested, original WRX is hard to find – and demands careful safeguarding with long term car storage – but it will always be a special car to those who know, especially with that flat-4 ‘boxer’ engine note. 1994 Ferrari F355 Top Speed: 183mph, BHP: 375, 0-60: 4.7 One of the prettiest modern Ferraris, the F355 is a heavily revised Ferrari 348 with significant styling and performance enhancements. With a 3.5 V8, peak power was delivered at a heady 8250rpm, and with it came a glorious wail from the longitudinally mounted V8. Improving the aerodynamics (over the 348) saw the F355 spend 1300 hours in the wind tunnel and resulted in a purity of design not seen in today’s world of bulges, scoops and vents. Available in Berlinetta (coupe) Spider and GTS (targa) variants the F355 remains in demand to this day, particularly when fitted with the gated 6-speed manual transmission.  1994 Porsche 993 Top Speed: 168mph, BHP: 300, 0.60: 5.6 (stats for Carrera model) The last of the air-cooled 911s has gained cult status since its demise in 1998 (when the controversial 996 variant replaced it). All 993 models were finely sculpted, almost pure. The base Carrera model lacked the muscular lines of the S and Turbo models but remained unarguably pretty with its unmistakably rear-wheel-drive design. Meanwhile, the 993 gained a light alloy subframe and coil and wishbone suspension (over the outgoing 964), plus a number of engine options, from the aforementioned Carrera to the fire-breathing rivet-arched GT2, capable of 186mph and 0-60 in under 4 seconds. 1995 Nissan Skyline GT-R (R33) Top Speed: 156mph, BHP: 276, 0-60: 5.2 The E-BCNR33 (R33) Skyline was introduced in 1995, following an enviable bloodline of coveted Japanese sports cars. The R33 GT-R arrived in January 1995 as a base model GT-R and V-Spec (the latter was 10kg heavier but came with a newer 4WD system, active limited slip differential and lower ground clearance). A test conducted at the Nürburgring by Best Motoring magazine recorded an 8.01.72 minutes lap (the fastest for a road-legal production car at the time) and the R33 Skyline continues to be a sought-after car around the world. With values rising for standard cars, and even modified examples commanding a high price, it’s a regular at Windrush’s classic car storage, with owners looking to protect that value.  1994 Aston Martin DB7 Top Speed: 155mph, BHP: 330, 0-60: 4.7 Designed by Ian Callum (later known for his work at Jaguar) the 3.2 supercharged six-cylinder DB7 was designed to be an ‘entry level’ Aston positioned below the hand-built V8 Virage – and ended up being the highest-produced Aston Martin ever with 7000 examples rolling off the line. The DB7 was made mostly with resources from Jaguar and had the financial backing of the Ford Motor Company. Remarkably, the DB7 chassis is a re-worked chassis from the Jaguar XJS – in fact, the DB7 design was originally to be a successor to the XJS, and would wear a Jaguar badge. Engineered by TWR on behalf of Aston Martin, the early supercharged six-cylinder cars were phased out in 1999, replaced by the more sought-after V12 engine found in the Vantage, GT and GTA models. Choose Windrush long term car storage for your modern classic This countdown might include some of our favourite visitors to Windrush’s long term car storage facilities in London and the Cotswolds. But we offer prestige car storage solutions for vehicles from every era, and take pride in keeping them in the form of their lives. Whether you own a modern classic from the ’90s, a venerable vintage from the golden age of motoring, or a supercar straight off the line, you can rely on our discreet and professional service. Take a moment to learn about Windrush’s twelve-stage induction process, plus the checkover and maintenance programme that runs like clockwork for the length of your stay. Then get in touch to book long term car storage that sets the gold standard. To learn more about our classic car storage in London and the Cotswolds, just drop us a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
  • the-best-v12-cars-of-all-time-main-original.jpeg?w=1024&h=682&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The Best V12 Cars Of All Time

    Read Article
    For over a century, the twelve-cylinder piston engine format has powered some of the greatest vehicles to grace Windrush’s classic car storage. Here are ten all-time favourites, picked by the team.   The V12 has history. Back in 1904, the world’s first twelve-cylinder piston engine – split into twin banks of six cylinders whose ‘V’ shape gave it the name – was originally designed for boat racing. Scan the annals since then and you’ll find the V12 powering everything from Panzer tanks and military trucks to diesel locomotives and World War II aircraft. But more than any of these, it’s the iconic automobiles featuring that classic engine configuration that have endured – and here at Windrush long term car storage, it’s our pleasure to keep them that way. Here are ten of the very best V12s, as chosen by our prestige car storage team.        McLaren F1 (1992) Think ‘supercar’ and the mental image that flashes up is still the legend unveiled at Monaco’s Sporting Club in May 1992. Gordon Murray’s concept and Peter Stevens’ body design were impeccable, but the mythology came from BMW Motorsport’s 6.1 V12, powering the McLaren to a production car world record of 240.1mph. Own one and you’re in good company, from Rowan Atkinson to Ralph Lauren. Pagani Zonda (1999) Founded by ex-Lamborghini engineer Horacio Pagani at the dawn of the ’90s, this Italian newcomer debuted in style with a supercar that went from underdog to object of desire overnight. Pagani’s famous attention to detail – and scholarly knowledge of composites – marked the Zonda out before you even turned the key, but the masterstroke was to include the 6.0 V12 from Mercedes-Benz AMG, nudging 400hp and ludicrously good fun. Lamborghini Miura Largely driven by his rivalry with Ferrari, Ferruccio Lamborghini hired the great Italian engineer Giotto Bizzarrini to dream up an engine that would pip the prancing horse, and from the late-’60s, his mid-mounted 3.9 V12 made the Miura look and move like an arrowhead on wheels. Perhaps Bizzarrini’s greatest triumph was his engine’s longevity: that V12 endured (with the occasional facelift) right through to the 2011 Lamborghini Murcielago.  Maserati MC12 As scarce as it gets – with just 50 road cars produced to homologate the 12 racers competing in the FIA GT Championship – the guts of the MC12 was the Ferrari F140 6.0 V12 (a derivative of which is in the Ferrari 812). It jumped off the mark like a scalded cat – 0-62mph in 3.8 seconds – topped out at 205mph, and is an occasional and very welcome guest at Windrush’s classic car storage.   Ferrari 812 Superfast The name wasn’t exactly subtle, but the Superfast lived up the billing. With a 6.5 V12 capable of 789hp and 9000rpm – with no turbocharging – there had never been a more powerful naturally aspirated production car engine when it debuted at the 2017 Geneva Motor Show. In fact, that engine was so good that Top Gear considered the rest of the Superfast almost an afterthought: “The mightiest V12 of them all. With the rest of a car attached…”   Rolls Royce Phantom Unlike the go-faster brigade elsewhere in this countdown, the Phantom was as silent, stately and serene as the name suggested. But that effortless vibe belied the graft being done within by the 6.75 N73 BMW V12, taken from the E65 BMW 7-Series, but with increased capacity. A car that reminded us that luxury, class and sophistication were not mutually exclusive with raw power. Jaguar V12 While many V12 cars are untouchable icons that exist only in the pages of magazines, Jaguar’s classic twelve-cylinder is the one you’re most likely to have sampled, thanks to its inclusion in multiple production models through the ’70s and ’80s. Stick a pin in Jaguar’s production history and you’ll find it doing the business, from the vintage E-Type to the XJS and XJ of the ’80s, Jaguar’s engine was complex, silent, powerful and, perhaps above all, abundant, bringing the V12 to the driveways of everyday drivers. Ferrari 250 (1953) Pinin Farina’s undulating closed berlinetta bodywork delivered on the style, but it was Gioacchino Colombo’s 2933cc V12 that supplied the substance, mounted longitudinally in the front and capable of 237hp. Far more than a stopgap, the engine would go on to be fitted to various incarnations of the 250 including the GTO, California Spyder and GT SWB. Mercedes-Benz S600 (1991) Hard to believe given its proud history, but in 1991, the S600 represented Benz’s first toe into the V12 market. The newly designed 6.0-litre engine was the German marque’s first mass-produced twelve-cylinder for a passenger car, not to mention the most powerful MB engine to date, packing 408hp. Audi Q7 TDI 2008 was a vintage year for Audi, with the marque cheering Allan McNish to Le Mans victory in an R10, while readying a new Q7 whose V12 twin-turbo diesel posted an audacious 1000nm of torque and 493hp. Autocar described it as “the Q7 for those who struggle with the concept of self-constraint and have very deep pockets” – and it was meant as a compliment. Choose Windrush prestige car storage, for V12s and beyond At Windrush’s long term car storage, we know exactly how to treat your car, whether it’s a vintage V12 or a cherished modern classic. Read a little more about our prestige car storage programme, and you’ll be reassured that our state of the art facilities in London and the Cotswolds are exactly where your vehicle should be when it’s resting off the road. From the warm welome of our professional washing and drying regime, to the regular checkovers and maintenance regime that keep your vehicle in peak condition for the length of its stay, no other prestige car storage programme goes further. The Windrush team is ready to welcome you to our classic car storage in London and the Cotswolds. To learn more, drop us a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
  • what-does-windrushs-iso-9001-status-mean-for-you-main-original.png?w=1024&h=576&scale
    1 Minute Read

    What does Windrush’s ISO 9001 status mean for you?

    Read Article
    At Windrush, we thrive on providing the best prestige car storage, and continually strive to be better. Our approach has enabled us to qualify for the highly regarded ISO9001 certified status – but what does that mean for our clients? Classic car storage, in town and country Established by Tim Earnshaw in 2004, Windrush operates two long term car storage centres: a secure, secretive storage facility situated underneath the streets of Central London and an expansive headquarters hidden from view within beautiful Cotswolds countryside. Both are renowned for offering unrivalled care and attention to detail for fastidious owners of all types of vehicle. A superior service, recognised by ISO status Since our launch, the Windrush classic car storage team has continually improved and enhanced our service levels, earning highly coveted ISO9001 certification in the process. ISO status is awarded on a number of quality management principles including strong customer focus, motivation and implication of top management, a process-driven approach and continual business improvement. ISO 9001 sets out strict measures for the quality management systems in place within an organisation. To remain certified, every member company has to prove and display a continually developing business which meets the expectations required to maintain ISO membership. Using ISO 9001 processes ensures Windrush customers receive consistent, good-quality products and services while helping our management team to promote continual internal development and service level enhancements. Prestige car storage, always going the extra mile At Windrush we never rest on our laurels, a fact that has earned our leading reputation in the classic car storage sector. Our clients already understand the levels we go to, but for those who would like to know more, we have detailed our meticulous processes here. Meanwhile, if you’re considering entrusting your vehicle to our long term car storage facilities, you may like to download our latest client PDF brochure. The entire Windrush team are proud to be the best, and assure our clients, present and future, that we will always seek new ways to improve our long term car storage service to stay well ahead of the rest. Windrush’s team is ready to talk you through our long term car storage service. Get in touch on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk    
  • the-top-10-cars-of-the-90s-main-original.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The Top 10 Cars Of The ’90s

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    Of course, there’s an undeniable charm to a puttering vintage classic. But with automotive technology taking quantum leaps every decade, the ’90s gave us some of the fastest and most finessed models in living memory. Whether you prefer your cars mouthier than a Gallagher brother or sleeker than a supermodel, here are ten modern classics, chosen by the Windrush prestige car storage team, that prove they do make ’em like they used to.           1992 Ford Escort Cosworth Top speed: 147mph, BHP: 224, 0-60: 5.7 A homologation special of the, otherwise lacklustre, fifth generation Ford Escort that competed in the World Rally Championship between 1993 and 1998, this winged weapon was available as a road car from 1992 until 1996 and caused quite a stir. Wide arches, big wings and large turbos made the car wonderfully anti-social; not surprisingly one of its biggest fans was Jeremy Clarkson, who bought one after testing it for Top Gear. 1990 Lamborghini Diablo Top speed: 202mph, BHP: 485, 0-60: 4.5  The Diablo concept started in 1985 and was intended as a replacement for the Countach, with the brief stating that the new car had to have a top speed of at least 315kph (196mph). When Chrysler Corporation bought Lamborghini they softened the original Marcello Gandini design, which infuriated the designer – still, the Diablo launched with a mid-mounted 5.7 V12 and rear wheel drive, becoming an instant icon.  1992 Jaguar XJ220 Top speed: 212.3mph, BHP: 542, 0-60: 4.2 Initial disappointment with the XJ220 has been well-documented. Initially shown as a V12 four-wheel-drive concept, the car was significantly changed when officially launched: 4WD became 2WD and V12 became a turbocharged V6. As a result, an initial order book of 1500 translated into sales of just 275 – though the recession of the ’90s didn’t help matters. Despite this, the XJ220 is now regarded as supercar royalty, its rarity adding to the appeal. And hey, V6 or not, those looks and 212 mph performance make it the stuff of legend.  1998 McLaren F1 Top Speed: 240.1mph, BHP: 627, 0-60: 3.2 The supercar benchmark and still the king, with a spec that included three seats (centre forward for the driver), gullwing doors, gold-plated engine bay and 240 mph. The brainchild of Gordon Murray, the F1 packed a motorsport-derived BMW V12 engine, though (unusually for McLaren at the time), it was designed purely as a road car, and its subsequent success on the track was an added bonus. Exotic construction made up of carbon-fibre, titanium, gold, magnesium and kevlar made for a remarkably light (1138kg) supercar that remains unsurpassed today, and the F1 is still an occasional guest at Windrush’s long term car storage. 1996 Lotus Elise Top Speed: 126mph, BHP: 118, 0-60: 5.8 The Elise may not be the most powerful car to come out of Norfolk, but it was one of the finest-handling cars of modern times. Weighing in at just 725kg the Series 1 Elise was capable of reaching 60mph in just 5.8 seconds, despite having just 118bhp. Designed by Julian Thomson, then Head of Design at Lotus, and Chief Engineer Richard Rackham, the Elise was built for driving with a low centre of gravity, few frills and a raw edge that was an instant success with buyers and headed a turn of fortune at Lotus. So good was the Elise, it has only just stopped production – though the car has seen numerous revisions over the years.  1994 Subaru Impreza Turbo Top Speed 143mph, BHP: 237, 0-60: 6.6 Subaru was, in the UK at least, the favoured wheels of farmers and rural dwellers who needed a rugged, dependable 4WD vehicle. But that all changed in 1994 when the Japanese manufacturer unveiled a turbo variant of their none-too-special Impreza saloon: one year later, Colin McRae would win the 1996 WRC Championship driving a version of the same car. The Impreza WRX offered sports car performance in a family saloon, becoming an instant hit with UK buyers with many cars being modified to very high power outputs. Today, an unmolested, original WRX is hard to find – and demands careful safeguarding with long term car storage – but it will always be a special car to those who know, especially with that flat-4 ‘boxer’ engine note. 1994 Ferrari F355 Top Speed: 183mph, BHP: 375, 0-60: 4.7 One of the prettiest modern Ferraris, the F355 is a heavily revised Ferrari 348 with significant styling and performance enhancements. With a 3.5 V8, peak power was delivered at a heady 8250rpm, and with it came a glorious wail from the longitudinally mounted V8. Improving the aerodynamics (over the 348) saw the F355 spend 1300 hours in the wind tunnel and resulted in a purity of design not seen in today’s world of bulges, scoops and vents. Available in Berlinetta (coupe) Spider and GTS (targa) variants the F355 remains in demand to this day, particularly when fitted with the gated 6-speed manual transmission.  1994 Porsche 993 Top Speed: 168mph, BHP: 300, 0.60: 5.6 (stats for Carrera model) The last of the air-cooled 911s has gained cult status since its demise in 1998 (when the controversial 996 variant replaced it). All 993 models were finely sculpted, almost pure. The base Carrera model lacked the muscular lines of the S and Turbo models but remained unarguably pretty with its unmistakably rear-wheel-drive design. Meanwhile, the 993 gained a light alloy subframe and coil and wishbone suspension (over the outgoing 964), plus a number of engine options, from the aforementioned Carrera to the fire-breathing rivet-arched GT2, capable of 186mph and 0-60 in under 4 seconds. 1995 Nissan Skyline GT-R (R33) Top Speed: 156mph, BHP: 276, 0-60: 5.2 The E-BCNR33 (R33) Skyline was introduced in 1995, following an enviable bloodline of coveted Japanese sports cars. The R33 GT-R arrived in January 1995 as a base model GT-R and V-Spec (the latter was 10kg heavier but came with a newer 4WD system, active limited slip differential and lower ground clearance). A test conducted at the Nürburgring by Best Motoring magazine recorded an 8.01.72 minutes lap (the fastest for a road-legal production car at the time) and the R33 Skyline continues to be a sought-after car around the world. With values rising for standard cars, and even modified examples commanding a high price, it’s a regular at Windrush’s classic car storage, with owners looking to protect that value.  1994 Aston Martin DB7 Top Speed: 155mph, BHP: 330, 0-60: 4.7 Designed by Ian Callum (later known for his work at Jaguar) the 3.2 supercharged six-cylinder DB7 was designed to be an ‘entry level’ Aston positioned below the hand-built V8 Virage – and ended up being the highest-produced Aston Martin ever with 7000 examples rolling off the line. The DB7 was made mostly with resources from Jaguar and had the financial backing of the Ford Motor Company. Remarkably, the DB7 chassis is a re-worked chassis from the Jaguar XJS – in fact, the DB7 design was originally to be a successor to the XJS, and would wear a Jaguar badge. Engineered by TWR on behalf of Aston Martin, the early supercharged six-cylinder cars were phased out in 1999, replaced by the more sought-after V12 engine found in the Vantage, GT and GTA models. Choose Windrush long term car storage for your modern classic This countdown might include some of our favourite visitors to Windrush’s long term car storage facilities in London and the Cotswolds. But we offer prestige car storage solutions for vehicles from every era, and take pride in keeping them in the form of their lives. Whether you own a modern classic from the ’90s, a venerable vintage from the golden age of motoring, or a supercar straight off the line, you can rely on our discreet and professional service. Take a moment to learn about Windrush’s twelve-stage induction process, plus the checkover and maintenance programme that runs like clockwork for the length of your stay. Then get in touch to book long term car storage that sets the gold standard. To learn more about our classic car storage in London and the Cotswolds, just drop us a line on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
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