1 Minute Read

Winter Wonders - 10 Best 4x4 cars

Posted by - Tim Earnshaw on 19 December 2022
Categories: Advice, Winter car storage

10 cool 4WD vehicles to get you through the snowy season in style, as chosen by Windrush’s luxury car storage team.

Whether it’s driving home for Christmas, or hopes to let it snow, let it snow, let it snow, this time of year conjures up a romantic vision of snowfall. Whilst the reality is a slushy mess of travel chaos, let’s dare to dream of the perfect white Christmas, with snowballs, picturesque scenes and, of course, cars. Here, Windrush’s long term car storage team presents 10 impossibly cool snowmobiles to get you through the festive season and beyond.

Jeep Wagoneer 1962-1991

The Jeep Wagoneer manages to do what few cars can by still being very cool, and favoured by the wealthy, long after its demise. Built-in various guises from the early 1960s to the beginning of the 1990s, with a 5.9 V8 throughout, it’s famous for its iconic wood panelling, familiar rectangular shape and go-anywhere capability. Very sought after today, they are a plush way to navigate winter, and look very stylish while doing it.

Jeep Wagoneer 1962-1991

Land Rover Defender 1948-2015

The British-built Land Rover is the stuff of legend. Unstoppable off-road, classless, familiar and now more desired than ever. Whilst we have a new Defender to enjoy, prices of the original are on the rise – perhaps we don’t know what we’ve got (had) until it’s gone? With a range of trusty diesels and V8 petrol engines the Defender became better and better equipped as it aged but could never be classed as luxurious. The Best 4x4xFar? We think so.

Land Rover Defender 1948-2015

Range Rover (Suffix B) January-October 1973

The early Range Rover needs no introduction. A 3-door luxury version of a Land Rover, from a time when features such as carpets and headrests gave a high-end feel to a 4×4. But the Range Rover was more than that, truly capable off-road, but extremely good on it, it was as suited to a motorway blast as it was a rutted mud track. Suffix B cars featured many improvements over the more common Suffix A such as rear window wash-wipe, better sound deadening and more instrumentation.

Range Rover (Suffix B) January-October 1973

Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen 1979-date

The Mercedes-Benz G-Class, or G-Wagen (an abbreviation of Geländewagen) was originally developed as a military off-roader, but later in its life more luxurious models were added to the line. It remains one of the longest-produced vehicles in Mercedes history having been on sale for over 40 years, and while we love the later AMG models, with their large V8 engines, it’s the earlier, unadorned models we’d choose for Christmas to truly celebrate the simple effectiveness the G-Wagen offers.

Mercedes-Benz G-Wagen 1979-date

Lamborghini LM002 1986-1993

The Lamborghini LM002 (often called the Rambo Lambo) offered a high-revving 450bhp V12 from the Countach upfront and a huge 290-litre fuel tank to ensure deep pockets were required to simply fill it with fuel. Its bulk meant it was fast, but not Countach fast. The LM002 will accelerate from 0 to 60 mph in 7.7 seconds and has a top speed of 118 mph but, even so, it remains the most outrageous 4×4 vehicle ever made, and is exactly what you’d expect from Lamborghini. The current Lamborghini Urus will forever live in its shadows. 

Lamborghini LM002 1986-1993

Saab 9-4X 2010-2011

The Swedes created an unlikely 4×4 shortly before the brand’s demise in 2010 and it lasted only one year in production. Rarity alone makes it cool, despite its humble Cadillac SRX underpinnings, and any car fan would raise an inquisitive eyebrow should one arrive at the family Christmas gathering. In total, 819 were made, offered with a choice of two petrol V6 engines; a diesel engine for the European market was discussed, but never arrived.

Saab 9-4X 2010-2011

Jensen FF 1966-1971

The Jensen FF was released in 1966 and was the first production car with all-wheel drive; it was also the first production car with an anti-lock braking system. Jensen only sold 320 between 1966 and 1971 so again, its rarity makes it extra cool. Based on the Jensen Interceptor, FF stands for Ferguson Formula, an all-wheel drive system developed by Ferguson Research Ltd. The FF is 5 inches longer than the standard Interceptor, and heavier, but it retains the bulletproof 6.2 V8 engine.

Jensen FF 1966-1971

Audi Allroad V8 1999-2005

The Audi Allroad blends the practicality, and good looks, of the C5 variant of the Audi A6 Avant with off-road capability. Sure, you won’t be troubling a Land Rover in it, but the raised ride height, body protection and chunky tyres with the Quattro 4WD system will get you further than expected. Choose the 4.2 V8, as we have, and you’ll also get 300hp, 280lb-ft of torque, 0-62mph in 7.2 seconds and a top speed of 149mph.

Audi Allroad V8 1999-2005

Subaru Forester 1997-2004

The first few generations of the Subaru Forester are the most interesting. Early cars offered estate car practicality with the proven Subaru reliability and 4WD traction, proving an instant hit with farmers and rural dwellers everywhere. Later versions offered performance to match the renowned Impreza with numerous fast models available across its lifetime, but each retained room for the family and the ability for some reasonable off-roading. 

Subaru Forester 1997-2004

Porsche Cayenne Turbo S 2006-2010

When launched, the looks of the Porsche Cayenne were somewhat challenging, but we think it’s maturing with age and now looks far less… striking. What it does offer is reasonable off-road ability (more than enough for winter snow) but, in Turbo S guise, it also has remarkable performance. The first-generation Turbo S was powered by a twin-turbo 4.5 V8 producing 514 hp and 530 lb⋅ft of torque. 0–60 mph took just 5.0 seconds, and the top speed was a heady 167 mph. In 2008 an updated 550 hp Turbo S model launched, with 0–60 mph in 4.7 seconds and 168 mph top speed.

Porsche Cayenne Turbo S 2006-2010

Choose Windrush classic car storage for a warm welcome

The weather outside might be frightful, but at Windrush classic car storage, your vehicle will always enjoy the optimum conditions. At our prestige car storage facilities in central London and the Cotswolds, we pride ourselves on giving every cherished vehicle the same care and attention to detail. It starts with the famous Windrush twelve-step induction process that ticks boxes you never even knew existed, and continues until you take back your keys and purr out of our premises with a car running better than ever.

From youngtimers to oldtimer classic cars, Windrush’s luxury car storage service is tailored to your vehicle. Drop a line to the team on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk

Get in touch
Call Cotswolds +44 (0) 1451 821 008
Call London +44 (0) 207 458 4418
winter-driving-advice-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale
5 Minute Read

Winter Driving Advice

Read Article
So you’ve placed your pride and joy in the care of the professionals at Windrush Car Storage. But…
Read Article
So you’ve placed your pride and joy in the care of the professionals at Windrush Car Storage. But what about you’re everyday car? Winter driving can be far more demanding than at other times of the year; darker evenings, wetter weather and too few gritting lorries! Below we have put together a few things to take note of when driving in winter conditions. Even if you are aware of the following, they may still make useful advice to pass onto an inexperienced driver or spouse… Windscreen Dirt and grime builds up quicker during winter, mostly due to leading and passing vehicles. It is especially important to clean the wiper blades. Doing so will eliminate those annoying streaks and smears when using your wipers. For best results wiper blades should be replaced once a year, ideally when the car is serviced. Windscreen washer fluid You would be surprised by the amount of times friends have asked to ‘borrow’ some! In winter make sure that the fluid is of adequate strength to ensure it does not freeze in the pipes. Most branded products will give a mix ratio on the label which may vary depending on expected temperatures. Don’t forget to check the rear wiper reservoir if separate to the front as well! Lights Some modern vehicles have separate headlight washers, which are activated with the front windscreen washer. Another reason to ensure washer fluid is topped up. If your car doesn’t have separate headlight washers, it is a good idea to ask your passenger very nicely to wipe them clean before your journey – or while you pay for fuel. Antifreeze Antifreeze both lowers the freezing point of the water used to cool your engine and raises the boiling point (notice how the gauge can sit close to 100?C and the water doesn’t boil like your kettle?). Check that it is of adequate strength with an appropriate gauge. Antifreeze also has anticorrosive properties so check that the solution is clear – not cloudy. Most respected garages will be able to check for free. Battery If the weather turns chilly the battery is one thing you may only notice when it’s too late. The day you get in your car, turn the key and nothing happens is the day we all dread, and is more common with long term car storage. Preventative maintenance is key!  Batteries will generally last five years of average use but there are things we can do to help them. When you start your car you are putting the most amount of strain on the battery. Think of it like asking a teenager to get out of bed at 8am, tidy their room and help around the house all at once – tricky to say the least. Because of this there are a few things we can do to help. When starting your car make sure that there is nothing else using power as well. Turn off the radio, lights, demisters and the heater, this will allow all the battery’s power to go to only starting the car. When the engine is running you can of course use all of these. Think of it like asking a teenager to do something when they’re actually out of bed. An ice scraper and deicer are handy tools to have in cold weather but are of little use if you can’t get into your car. In some cold conditions door surrounds can freeze to the bodywork making entry rather difficult and potentially damaging. Deicer could be used to help free a frozen door if left on a garden wall or in your coat pocket overnight. Tyres The UK legal minimum tread depth is for ‘a minimum of 1.6mm in a continuous band throughout the central three-quarters of the tread width, throughout the whole of the circumference.’ Winter driving can often mean wet and occasionally snowy or slushy driving conditions. In order that cars maintain grip on the roads in such conditions most premium tyre manufacturers recommended that cars have a minimum of 3mm, especially in winter conditions. How do you check the tread depth? Easy – rummage in that loose change in your car and find a 20 pence piece. Insert the coin between the tread. If you can see the outer edge of the coin; the tread depth is less than 3mm. Handy eh? Tread depth can also affect braking distances. The Highway Code says braking allowances should be doubled in the wet and multiplied by ten (yes x10!) in icy conditions. A tyre with a tread depth of 3mm will stop in 91m from 70mph. The same tyre with a tread depth of only 1.6mm will stop in 135m from 70mph. A staggering 44m difference! Have a look at the spare as well – easier to check it now than on the hard shoulder! When doing so check that you have a jack, wheel brace and locking wheel nut key as well. A spare wheel in good working order is of little use without the tools to change it! Air conditioning Air conditioning keeps you cool in the summer and warm in the winter – huge surprise I know! It also dries the air out inside your car.  Ever been driving when its cold, maybe it starts to rain and your windscreen starts to mist over? Leave the air conditioning on and it will help to dry the air far quicker, allowing you to see much easier. Any thoughts of turning it off to save fuel should be expelled! By continually not using it, seals in the system can become ineffective – leading the A/C gas to leak out over time and a funny smell when you do use it. Most of the time we drive we’re not setting a record for the most amount of miles driven on one tank so leave it on and enjoy the benefits. Wash your car regularly Unfortunately winter driving is when most of the dirt and grime can build up on your car. Because of this your car should be washed more regularly in winter. Use a pressure washer in and around wheel arches. Most big petrol stations will have a ‘jet wash’ as well as a drive through car wash. Washing the salt off alloy wheels will also help prevent salt corroding and getting beneath the lacquer. That annoying squeal you might get when you brake can be caused simply by dirt between the brake pad and disc. Washing it off means you won’t get it every time you put your foot on the brake peddle! Safety equipment As seen over the past few years there is often little warning when severe weather can strike. Make sure you have a warning triangle, high visibility vest, some warm clothing and any extra supplies, e.g. a container of screen wash fluid.
the-worlds-best-ice-drives-main-original-1670303080.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
1 Minute Read

The World’s Best Ice Drives

Read Article
When winter bites, there are two courses of action for the car enthusiast. The first is to power…
Read Article
When winter bites, there are two courses of action for the car enthusiast. The first is to power down your vehicle for the season, either by planning your own long term car storage solution or by turning to the professionals at Windrush. But the second option is to embrace the sub-zero conditions and embark on one of the grandest adventures that off-grid motoring has to offer. Perhaps you’ve always been intrigued by the idea of an ice drive, but didn’t know where to start. This winter, take the plunge and try one of these five frosty routes picked out by Windrush’s luxury car storage team. Pello, Finland The Finns claim to have invented ice driving, and whether that’s true or not, the Scandinavian nation certainly has some of the finest stretches. Head for Pello in Lapland, check your vehicle over at the village of Juoksenki, then follow the Arctic Circle ice road that connects the borders of Finland and Sweden. Spellbinding in its untouched beauty, the route enjoys the best driving conditions between December and April. Arjeplog, Sweden Cross the border to Swedish Lapland and you’ll find a bewitching wilderness whose centrepiece – Lake Uddjaur – is a connoisseur’s choice amongst ice drivers. There’s a number of professional rally schools operating in the area who’ll supply all the gear – right down to the thermal underwear – and equip you with the stud-tyred BMWs and Volvos in which experienced drivers can potentially top out at over 60mph. Abondance, France Mother Nature is responsible for some of Europe’s most incredible ice roads, but head to the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in the French Alps and you’ll be awestruck by the continent’s biggest man-made circuit. Whether you bring your own car or rent the most popular Porsche Cayman and Alpine A110 models, Abondance’s hairpins and S-bends mean you’ll need your wits about you. If you’re staying at the ski resort of the same name, fit this once-in-a-lifetime experience into your holiday itinerary at all costs. Lake Khövsgöl, Mongolia Mongolian winters are perishingly cold – with temperatures routinely dropping to minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit – but you’ll find good cheer at Lake Khövsgöl in the northwest province of the same name. As the location of the annual Festival Of Ice, the ancient lake hosts myriad activities, from bone throwing to archery. But with ice as thick as 160cm, the most exciting pursuit is simply turning the key and heading for the horizon. Lake Baikal, Siberia Make no mistake, crossing this forty-mile natural skating rink in deepest Russia is not for first-timers – but if you’re a veteran ice driver seeking the ultimate challenge, Lake Baikal is the equivalent of Everest. Set in a bleakly beautiful landscape, the lake’s rough, bumpy, pitted surface – with the occasional foot-wide crevasse – means a local guide is essential, but if you make it across, you’ll have the kudos of all in the ice driving community. Warm up at Windrush classic car storage Come in out of the cold at Windrush’s long-term car storage facilities in London and the Cotswolds. We know exactly what warms the cockles of a cherished vehicle, and we pledge unbeatable attention to detail for the duration of your stay. You’ll notice the Windrush difference in our renowned twelve-step induction process, and that’s just the start of a prestige car storage service that always goes the extra mile, with ongoing maintenance and checkovers right through to the moment we hand back the keys. Rely on Windrush for luxury car storage with a warm welcome. We’re ready and waiting for your inquiry on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
the-uks-highest-driving-roads-main-original-1657527077.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
1 Minute Read

The UK’s Highest Driving Roads

Read Article
Ask an enthusiast for the world’s best high-altitude driving roads and you’ll get the stock answers, from Italy’s…
Read Article
Ask an enthusiast for the world’s best high-altitude driving roads and you’ll get the stock answers, from Italy’s Grande Strada Delle Dolomiti to France’s Route Des Grandes Alpes. All undeniable classics, but it’s worth taking a moment to consider the neck-craning routes a little closer to home.   Here are six of the UK’s highest driving roads, as chosen by Windrush’s classic car storage team.  Cairnwell Pass, Aviemore, Scotland (670m/2198ft) To Scotland first, inevitably, and the highest mountain pass in Britain. You’ll approach on the A93, pass the Glenshee Ski Resort and feel the elevation suddenly spike in the final few kilometres. Drink in the sweeping melodrama of looming Cairnwell Mountain – but don’t let your guard down until you’ve negotiated the double hairpin aptly named the Devil’s Elbow.   Black Hill, North Pennines (609m/1998ft) There are many other Black Hills in Britain, but this Pennines route towers over them all, slicing through a pleasingly barren landscape en route to the border of Cumbria and Northumberland. Windswept and primal, it’s the closest you can get to road-movie ambience on UK soil. The Lecht, Aviemore, Scotland (635m/2083ft) Whether or not you’re visiting the ski centre of the same name, you have to drive the Lecht ascent, notable for its minimalist beauty and a ferocious gradient that at times hits one-in-five. Be aware, this is a drive for the warmer months, when you’ll avoid the seasonal snow that often forces road closures. Harthope Moss, North Pennines (627m/2057ft) The joint-highest road pass in England, Harthope Moss will buffet you with high winds and pin you to your seat with a gradient percentage that nudges into double-digits. But this test of your engine’s mettle is all worth it for the head in the clouds panorama that awaits you at the summit. Killhope Cross, North Pennines (627m/2057ft) Tied for the title of England’s highest pass, Killhope Cross carves through open moorland and reminds you of its dizzying altitude with the snow poles that line the roadside. Soak up the Pennines landscape at its rough and tumble best, then end your journey with a coffee at The Hive café in Nenthead (one of England’s highest villages). Bealach Na Ba, Applecross, Scotland (626m/2054ft) Hard to pronounce, impossible to forget, this much-loved route offers perhaps the greatest low-to-high ascent on our list, climbing steadily from sea level to what genuinely feels like the top of the world. Not just steep but twisty too, Bealach Na Ba is a must-drive, offering a little piece of Alpine atmosphere without needing to pack a passport. Then come back down to earth with Windrush classic car storage After you’ve lived the high life, visit Windrush long term car storage for the solutions that will keep your cherished model fighting fit. We’re proud to offer twin facilities in London and the Cotswolds, where every vehicle is treated to the sector’s most exacting prestige car storage programme.  From our renowned twelve-step induction process to the tailored maintenance schedule that evolves during your stay, we’ll look after the big picture and fine details. And rest assured, the moment you’re itching to turn the key in the ignition again, we’ll be ready and waiting. Turn to Windrush for prestige car storage that goes further. The Windrush team is ready to hear from you on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk 
  • winter-driving-advice-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale
    5 Minute Read

    Winter Driving Advice

    Read Article
    So you’ve placed your pride and joy in the care of the professionals at Windrush Car Storage. But what about you’re everyday car? Winter driving can be far more demanding than at other times of the year; darker evenings, wetter weather and too few gritting lorries! Below we have put together a few things to take note of when driving in winter conditions. Even if you are aware of the following, they may still make useful advice to pass onto an inexperienced driver or spouse… Windscreen Dirt and grime builds up quicker during winter, mostly due to leading and passing vehicles. It is especially important to clean the wiper blades. Doing so will eliminate those annoying streaks and smears when using your wipers. For best results wiper blades should be replaced once a year, ideally when the car is serviced. Windscreen washer fluid You would be surprised by the amount of times friends have asked to ‘borrow’ some! In winter make sure that the fluid is of adequate strength to ensure it does not freeze in the pipes. Most branded products will give a mix ratio on the label which may vary depending on expected temperatures. Don’t forget to check the rear wiper reservoir if separate to the front as well! Lights Some modern vehicles have separate headlight washers, which are activated with the front windscreen washer. Another reason to ensure washer fluid is topped up. If your car doesn’t have separate headlight washers, it is a good idea to ask your passenger very nicely to wipe them clean before your journey – or while you pay for fuel. Antifreeze Antifreeze both lowers the freezing point of the water used to cool your engine and raises the boiling point (notice how the gauge can sit close to 100?C and the water doesn’t boil like your kettle?). Check that it is of adequate strength with an appropriate gauge. Antifreeze also has anticorrosive properties so check that the solution is clear – not cloudy. Most respected garages will be able to check for free. Battery If the weather turns chilly the battery is one thing you may only notice when it’s too late. The day you get in your car, turn the key and nothing happens is the day we all dread, and is more common with long term car storage. Preventative maintenance is key!  Batteries will generally last five years of average use but there are things we can do to help them. When you start your car you are putting the most amount of strain on the battery. Think of it like asking a teenager to get out of bed at 8am, tidy their room and help around the house all at once – tricky to say the least. Because of this there are a few things we can do to help. When starting your car make sure that there is nothing else using power as well. Turn off the radio, lights, demisters and the heater, this will allow all the battery’s power to go to only starting the car. When the engine is running you can of course use all of these. Think of it like asking a teenager to do something when they’re actually out of bed. An ice scraper and deicer are handy tools to have in cold weather but are of little use if you can’t get into your car. In some cold conditions door surrounds can freeze to the bodywork making entry rather difficult and potentially damaging. Deicer could be used to help free a frozen door if left on a garden wall or in your coat pocket overnight. Tyres The UK legal minimum tread depth is for ‘a minimum of 1.6mm in a continuous band throughout the central three-quarters of the tread width, throughout the whole of the circumference.’ Winter driving can often mean wet and occasionally snowy or slushy driving conditions. In order that cars maintain grip on the roads in such conditions most premium tyre manufacturers recommended that cars have a minimum of 3mm, especially in winter conditions. How do you check the tread depth? Easy – rummage in that loose change in your car and find a 20 pence piece. Insert the coin between the tread. If you can see the outer edge of the coin; the tread depth is less than 3mm. Handy eh? Tread depth can also affect braking distances. The Highway Code says braking allowances should be doubled in the wet and multiplied by ten (yes x10!) in icy conditions. A tyre with a tread depth of 3mm will stop in 91m from 70mph. The same tyre with a tread depth of only 1.6mm will stop in 135m from 70mph. A staggering 44m difference! Have a look at the spare as well – easier to check it now than on the hard shoulder! When doing so check that you have a jack, wheel brace and locking wheel nut key as well. A spare wheel in good working order is of little use without the tools to change it! Air conditioning Air conditioning keeps you cool in the summer and warm in the winter – huge surprise I know! It also dries the air out inside your car.  Ever been driving when its cold, maybe it starts to rain and your windscreen starts to mist over? Leave the air conditioning on and it will help to dry the air far quicker, allowing you to see much easier. Any thoughts of turning it off to save fuel should be expelled! By continually not using it, seals in the system can become ineffective – leading the A/C gas to leak out over time and a funny smell when you do use it. Most of the time we drive we’re not setting a record for the most amount of miles driven on one tank so leave it on and enjoy the benefits. Wash your car regularly Unfortunately winter driving is when most of the dirt and grime can build up on your car. Because of this your car should be washed more regularly in winter. Use a pressure washer in and around wheel arches. Most big petrol stations will have a ‘jet wash’ as well as a drive through car wash. Washing the salt off alloy wheels will also help prevent salt corroding and getting beneath the lacquer. That annoying squeal you might get when you brake can be caused simply by dirt between the brake pad and disc. Washing it off means you won’t get it every time you put your foot on the brake peddle! Safety equipment As seen over the past few years there is often little warning when severe weather can strike. Make sure you have a warning triangle, high visibility vest, some warm clothing and any extra supplies, e.g. a container of screen wash fluid.
  • the-worlds-best-ice-drives-main-original-1670303080.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The World’s Best Ice Drives

    Read Article
    When winter bites, there are two courses of action for the car enthusiast. The first is to power down your vehicle for the season, either by planning your own long term car storage solution or by turning to the professionals at Windrush. But the second option is to embrace the sub-zero conditions and embark on one of the grandest adventures that off-grid motoring has to offer. Perhaps you’ve always been intrigued by the idea of an ice drive, but didn’t know where to start. This winter, take the plunge and try one of these five frosty routes picked out by Windrush’s luxury car storage team. Pello, Finland The Finns claim to have invented ice driving, and whether that’s true or not, the Scandinavian nation certainly has some of the finest stretches. Head for Pello in Lapland, check your vehicle over at the village of Juoksenki, then follow the Arctic Circle ice road that connects the borders of Finland and Sweden. Spellbinding in its untouched beauty, the route enjoys the best driving conditions between December and April. Arjeplog, Sweden Cross the border to Swedish Lapland and you’ll find a bewitching wilderness whose centrepiece – Lake Uddjaur – is a connoisseur’s choice amongst ice drivers. There’s a number of professional rally schools operating in the area who’ll supply all the gear – right down to the thermal underwear – and equip you with the stud-tyred BMWs and Volvos in which experienced drivers can potentially top out at over 60mph. Abondance, France Mother Nature is responsible for some of Europe’s most incredible ice roads, but head to the Auvergne-Rhône-Alpes region in the French Alps and you’ll be awestruck by the continent’s biggest man-made circuit. Whether you bring your own car or rent the most popular Porsche Cayman and Alpine A110 models, Abondance’s hairpins and S-bends mean you’ll need your wits about you. If you’re staying at the ski resort of the same name, fit this once-in-a-lifetime experience into your holiday itinerary at all costs. Lake Khövsgöl, Mongolia Mongolian winters are perishingly cold – with temperatures routinely dropping to minus 58 degrees Fahrenheit – but you’ll find good cheer at Lake Khövsgöl in the northwest province of the same name. As the location of the annual Festival Of Ice, the ancient lake hosts myriad activities, from bone throwing to archery. But with ice as thick as 160cm, the most exciting pursuit is simply turning the key and heading for the horizon. Lake Baikal, Siberia Make no mistake, crossing this forty-mile natural skating rink in deepest Russia is not for first-timers – but if you’re a veteran ice driver seeking the ultimate challenge, Lake Baikal is the equivalent of Everest. Set in a bleakly beautiful landscape, the lake’s rough, bumpy, pitted surface – with the occasional foot-wide crevasse – means a local guide is essential, but if you make it across, you’ll have the kudos of all in the ice driving community. Warm up at Windrush classic car storage Come in out of the cold at Windrush’s long-term car storage facilities in London and the Cotswolds. We know exactly what warms the cockles of a cherished vehicle, and we pledge unbeatable attention to detail for the duration of your stay. You’ll notice the Windrush difference in our renowned twelve-step induction process, and that’s just the start of a prestige car storage service that always goes the extra mile, with ongoing maintenance and checkovers right through to the moment we hand back the keys. Rely on Windrush for luxury car storage with a warm welcome. We’re ready and waiting for your inquiry on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk
  • the-uks-highest-driving-roads-main-original-1657527077.jpeg?w=1024&h=576&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The UK’s Highest Driving Roads

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    Ask an enthusiast for the world’s best high-altitude driving roads and you’ll get the stock answers, from Italy’s Grande Strada Delle Dolomiti to France’s Route Des Grandes Alpes. All undeniable classics, but it’s worth taking a moment to consider the neck-craning routes a little closer to home.   Here are six of the UK’s highest driving roads, as chosen by Windrush’s classic car storage team.  Cairnwell Pass, Aviemore, Scotland (670m/2198ft) To Scotland first, inevitably, and the highest mountain pass in Britain. You’ll approach on the A93, pass the Glenshee Ski Resort and feel the elevation suddenly spike in the final few kilometres. Drink in the sweeping melodrama of looming Cairnwell Mountain – but don’t let your guard down until you’ve negotiated the double hairpin aptly named the Devil’s Elbow.   Black Hill, North Pennines (609m/1998ft) There are many other Black Hills in Britain, but this Pennines route towers over them all, slicing through a pleasingly barren landscape en route to the border of Cumbria and Northumberland. Windswept and primal, it’s the closest you can get to road-movie ambience on UK soil. The Lecht, Aviemore, Scotland (635m/2083ft) Whether or not you’re visiting the ski centre of the same name, you have to drive the Lecht ascent, notable for its minimalist beauty and a ferocious gradient that at times hits one-in-five. Be aware, this is a drive for the warmer months, when you’ll avoid the seasonal snow that often forces road closures. Harthope Moss, North Pennines (627m/2057ft) The joint-highest road pass in England, Harthope Moss will buffet you with high winds and pin you to your seat with a gradient percentage that nudges into double-digits. But this test of your engine’s mettle is all worth it for the head in the clouds panorama that awaits you at the summit. Killhope Cross, North Pennines (627m/2057ft) Tied for the title of England’s highest pass, Killhope Cross carves through open moorland and reminds you of its dizzying altitude with the snow poles that line the roadside. Soak up the Pennines landscape at its rough and tumble best, then end your journey with a coffee at The Hive café in Nenthead (one of England’s highest villages). Bealach Na Ba, Applecross, Scotland (626m/2054ft) Hard to pronounce, impossible to forget, this much-loved route offers perhaps the greatest low-to-high ascent on our list, climbing steadily from sea level to what genuinely feels like the top of the world. Not just steep but twisty too, Bealach Na Ba is a must-drive, offering a little piece of Alpine atmosphere without needing to pack a passport. Then come back down to earth with Windrush classic car storage After you’ve lived the high life, visit Windrush long term car storage for the solutions that will keep your cherished model fighting fit. We’re proud to offer twin facilities in London and the Cotswolds, where every vehicle is treated to the sector’s most exacting prestige car storage programme.  From our renowned twelve-step induction process to the tailored maintenance schedule that evolves during your stay, we’ll look after the big picture and fine details. And rest assured, the moment you’re itching to turn the key in the ignition again, we’ll be ready and waiting. Turn to Windrush for prestige car storage that goes further. The Windrush team is ready to hear from you on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk 
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