1 Minute Read

Why Windrush uses Storage Plus fuel for our long term car storage clients

Posted by - Tim Earnshaw on 11 August 2021 (Updated 5 September 2021)
Categories: Advice, Tips & Tricks, Winter car storage

Ever keen to stay one step ahead of any potential issues that may arise during long term car storage, Windrush has spent many months investigating the issues surrounding fuel degradation over prolonged periods.

It’s a common problem many will have experienced, resulting in misfiring when a car is restarted after a period of rest, often caused due to clogged fuel systems or by deteriorated fuel. As such, fuelling is one of the key factors we think about when we welcome your vehicle to our prestige car storage in London and the Cotswolds.

The problem with hygroscopic fuel

The problem with hygroscopic fuel

Modern petrol is hygroscopic due to the mandatory inclusion of ethanol in all unleaded and most super unleaded fuels. The downside of this becomes apparent when a fuel system is not designed to cope with ethanol, which includes most cars built before 2002, as ethanol corrodes fuel lines and can cause internal damage. In addition to corroding aluminium, copper and brass, ethanol also attacks plastics and rubber and absorbs water. The change to pump fuel due in September will move all regular 95RON fuels to 10% ethanol. These will be marked as E10 on the pumps to denote this. The higher-octane pump fuel grades can remain at their current ethanol content of between 5 – 7% where they will be marked as E5.

Trouble in the tank

Trouble in the tank

Even before the addition of ethanol, storing fuel has always been an issue. In 2010 BP produced a report entitled ‘Petrol life in vehicle fuel tanks’ which said “Petrol is a mixture of many components with different properties that contribute to the performance of the fuel. When petrol is exposed to the air it will in time completely evaporate. As it evaporates the composition and properties will change because different components evaporate at different rates. This is a normal feature of petrol, and the same process takes place in fuel tanks. Where petrol is kept for more than a week it can become stale and it is better to add fresh fuel before using, especially in classic, veteran vintage and racing cars.”

Smarter fuelling for classic car storage

Smarter fuelling for classic car storage

While permanent damage is rare, Windrush’s prestige car storage service is built on an ethos of providing first class vehicle preservation during off-road periods and now offers the option of using Storage Plus fuel for complete peace of mind. Designed by the Anglo-American Oil Company to be stable for at least three years, this special storage fuel does not contain ethanol and will not absorb water. It also burns extremely cleanly and has a distillation curve that is similar to the premium, undiluted fuels offered in the 1970s.  Manchester University included Storage Plus fuel in a test and concluded it was “far superior to any modern fuel in all aspects apart from the price” – but for Windrush’s long term car storage clients, only the best is good enough.

 

Specifically formulated to be kinder on gaskets, O-rings and other fuel system components compared to regular unleaded petrol, Storage Plus fuel contains detergent additives for engine cleanliness and antioxidants and corrosion inhibitors to extend storage life. As an added benefit, its 99 RON and 92MON provides excellent protection from detonation.

The fuel choice of Windrush’s prestige car storage team

Tim Earnshaw, Founder and Managing Director of Windrush, used the Storage Plus fuel in his own classic Land Rover on the day it arrived on site. “I’d just been out to give the Landy a run after a period of rest – on my driveway, not at Windrush – and it wasn’t performing as it should, struggling up hills and misfiring a little. A quarter tank of Storage Plus fuel (and a replacement fuel line) saw it immediately back up to speed. An instant transformation.”

 

A number of Windrush clients have also requested the use of Storage Plus fuel with the same immediate results – and we’re pleased to offer this fuelling solution at our long term car storage sites in London and the Cotswolds.

To find out more about our fuelling solutions and hear why Windrush offers the very best in classic car storage, supercar storage and cherished vehicle storage, get in touch with the team today.

Get in touch
Call Cotswolds +44 (0) 1451 821 008
Call London +44 (0) 207 458 4418
fuel-tips-for-car-storage-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale
3 Minute Read

Fuel Tips For Long Term Car Storage

Read Article
Fuel smart and you’ll keep your vehicle healthy during long term car storage. Here’s the expert advice your…
Read Article
Fuel smart and you’ll keep your vehicle healthy during long term car storage. Here’s the expert advice your tank will thank you for. Squeeze pump. Swipe card. Filling up isn’t exactly rocket science – but when you place your vehicle in long term car storage, the rules are a little different. Left in an inactive car for longer periods, unused fuel can cause a host of mechanical issues. But whether you bring your vehicle to Windrush for specialist long term car storage – or follow the advice below before resting your vehicle at home – we’ll keep you ticking over. The Problem When it’s kept too long in an enclosed container like your vehicle’s tank or engine, fuel starts to degrade. The octane content reduces, and the petrol becomes stale, leading to blockages within the fuel lines, fuel pump and tank. Diesel vehicles suffer from a similar problem called waxing. And while most fuel contains additives to slow this process down, over a period of time these additives will themselves deteriorate. Meanwhile, fuel refiners are gradually increasing the ethanol levels in their product. True, ethanol blended into fuel is better for the environment. But for the car enthusiast whose vehicle sits unused for long periods, it’s less desirable, reducing fuel stability, causing metal corrosion within fuel systems, as well as hardening rubber fuel lines and plastic components like floats, seals and diaphragms. Add to that, ethanol is hydroscopic, so the water it absorbs will sink to the bottom of the fuel tank, causing rough running and corrosion in fuel systems. Thankfully, this is less of an issue in dehumidified facilities, like Windrush’s long term car storage locations in London and the Cotswolds. Four Fuelling Solutions Before you take your car off the road, it’s worth deciding how you plan to keep your fuel fresh and your vehicle functional. In our experience, these are the four most effective tactics before you book long term car storage. One of the most straightforward methods is to simply leave a small amount of fuel in your vehicle’s tank and add a little fresh fuel to this every few months. This will refresh the fuel in the tank and stop it deteriorating. Another effective approach is to fully fill the tank with high octane fuel. This larger volume of premium fuel will degrade much slower over time than a small amount of low-quality fuel left at the bottom of the tank. When you fill the fuel tank, also add a fuel stabilizer, to stop it degrading and contaminating the tank, injectors and more. Be sure to choose the best fuel stabilizer for car storage and use it at optimum dilution: that way, you could protect your vehicle for up to two years (though it’s not advised to leave the same fuel in your tank for more than a few years). For the ultimate preservation of a vehicle’s fuel system, use a non-ethanol fuel. This fuel type is not widely available, and can usually only be purchased as racing fuel at a high price per litre. But non-ethanol fuel is doubly effective, as it’s usually high octane rated, too, which will also significantly slow down the degrading process. The Windrush Difference From the ideal fuel brands to the best fuel stabilizer for car storage, when you choose Windrush, we’ll assess the unique requirements of your vehicle and decide on the best approach. It’s all part of a complete classic car storage solution that sets us apart. After a thorough twelve-step induction process – including a full fluid checkover – we’ll settle your car in its own dehumidified, climate-controlled indoor storage bay, maintained with 24/7 security, twice-daily checks, weekly battery and drip tray inspections, plus an expert maintenance checkover every 60 days. To discover more about Windrush long term car storage, get in touch today.
the-windrush-guide-to-e5-e10-and-ethanol-free-fuel-main-original-1.jpeg?w=1024&h=681&scale
1 Minute Read

The Windrush Guide To E5, E10 and…

Read Article
With varying ethanol levels in modern fuel impacting everything from performance to corrosion, it’s worth learning a little…
Read Article
With varying ethanol levels in modern fuel impacting everything from performance to corrosion, it’s worth learning a little more about what comes out of the pump. As we move closer to the UK’s adoption of ethanol-rich E10 in September, here’s what you need to know about fuelling for everyday driving and long term car storage. What are E5 & E10 fuels? Fill up on a UK forecourt today and, chances are, you’ll be putting E5 into the tank. E5’s name comes from the fact that it contains up to 5% bio-ethanol – a figure that will rise to 10% in the E10 fuel set to be rolled out across the UK from September. It’s hard to fault the government’s logic: that additional 5% ethanol could cut CO2 emissions by 750,000 tonnes/year (equivalent to 350,000 cars) and give the UK a fighting chance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050. For motorists, however, E10 is contentious – even the RAC has advised owners of any car built before 2002 to avoid it or risk mechanical damage. Why could E10 damage my classic car? It’s all down to that double dose of ethanol. Ethanol is hygroscopic: it attracts water and absorbs moisture from the air, causing condensation and, in the long-term, the corrosion of car parts like carburettors, fuel lines and fuel tanks. To compound the problem, ethanol is a solvent, so over time it will damage any component made of plastic, rubber or fibreglass. Modern fuel-injected cars have fuel systems designed to process E10, which has been a fixture in European countries like Germany since 2011. But for historic vehicles, the added ethanol in the blend spells potential damage, especially if you put it into long term car storage without precautions. At Windrush, preventing fuel-related mechanical damage is a key part of our long term car storage programme. Here are four fuelling solutions to get familiar with. How does the long-term performance of different fuels compare? As a general rule of thumb, old fuel doesn’t combust as readily as fresh. On the road, a lack of power following long term car storage is the telltale symptom of degraded fuel, and this explains why classics that have been off the road a long time will often only run on choke/blipping of throttle. But the blend makes a big difference in how well your fuel lasts. In independent tests, non-ethanol fuel has been shown to stay more flammable over extended periods. Meanwhile, the RAC has referred to reports that claim E10 is less stable, which can make a vehicle with E10 in the tank particularly difficult to start following long term car storage. Can fuel stabilisers improve fuel performance? In a recent video by the YouTube channel Project Farm, presenter Todd Osgood ran a series of tests that suggested fuel stabilisers aren’t the silver bullet you might think. He acknowledged that when an additive was added to E10, an aluminium part left to soak in the blend corroded less than it did in standard E10 (although there was still some damage). But he also found that adding stabiliser to E10 didn’t stop it degrading. By contrast, with non-ethanol fuel, there was less evaporation, greater lifespan and no hint of parts corrosion (regardless of whether stabiliser was added or not). “If you’re using non-ethanol fuel,” concluded Osgood, “your carburettor is safe from the type of corrosion that ethanol causes.” What’s the best fuelling solution? It’s worth remembering that E10 is not the only option. E5 is likely to remain on UK forecourts for another five years, but even better for owners of historic cars could be investigating ethanol-free fuels. At the time of writing, there is no requirement for ethanol to be included in super unleaded (97/99) grade petrol, so if you’re driving a cherished older vehicle (or putting one into long term car storage), consider a switch to the UK’s only ethanol-free fuels, Esso Synergy Supreme+ Unleaded 97 and Synergy Supreme+ 99. Taking a long-term view, we’d advise that any car with fuel held in the tank for over three years should be drained and replaced with ethanol-free petrol. Optimal fuelling is just one element of Windrush’s long term car storage in Central London and the Cotswolds. To find out more, email us on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk.
target-environment-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale
3 Minute Read

Target Environment

Read Article
Due to the multitude of different materials present in any car, whether it be a classic, vintage or…
Read Article
Due to the multitude of different materials present in any car, whether it be a classic, vintage or modern vehicle, there is a very specific environment in which vehicles should be stored to maintain condition. Moisture is the cause of rust and mould and it is this which needs to be managed. At Windrush Car Storage we have spent (and spend) great deal of time researching the different opinions and ‘best practice’ for the storing your pride and joy in the best possible environment. In summary there are several options: Heating Whilst we may believe this is going to be ‘good’ for your pride and joy, there are several drawbacks. Firstly it’s expensive, how many of our garages are insulated? This means that the heater will be going a lot of time, with a lot of the heat straight out of the roof and walls. Secondly the heat has to come from somewhere. This usually means that the method of doing this has introduced a fire risk, not ideal. Finally, warm air does not necessarily mean dry air. By heating the air the amount of moisture it can hold actually rises. If you brought your vehicle out of the cold into your nice warm garage, condensation would immediately form on all of the surfaces (similar to taking a milk bottle out of the fridge and into the warmer air of your kitchen). Further information on this topic can be found by clicking here. Ventilation For air to form condensation it needs to be still. (On a windy cold night you’ll never find condensation on your lawn whereas on a cold, still night you will!) By keeping the air moving in your garage it is possible to prevent condensation forming. The downside of this is that the air can still be laden with moisture and wherever the air is allowed to become still (inside the engine bay, exhaust, interior etc) condensation can form starting the rusting or mould process. Plastic Enclosures The next step on from ventilating the whole garage is to place the vehicle inside a purpose built enclosure a little larger than the vehicle where powerful fans draw in air through filters to remove any dust particles and then circulate the air around the vehicle. Several manufacturers supply systems that enclose the car completely in a plastic ‘bubble.’ Advantages are that 99% of dust is filtered out and air is continually being moved by fans to prevent condensation forming. These also have the additional benefit of preventing any objects accidentally coming into contact with the bodywork. The best in our opinion have an internal supporting framework, such as the Airflow AirChamber. Dehumidification The preferred method of removing moisture from the air and regarded as ‘best practice’ in the vehicle storage industry is by dehumidifying the storage environment. Dehumidifying allows vehicles stored in a garage to remain condensation and corrosion free. Units reduce and then maintain the humidity. It is important not to dry the air too much as a relative humidity (RH) drier than 55% may dry any wood (dashboards) or leather too much, causing them to warp and crack. Anything ‘wetter’ than a RH of 55% will allow exposed, untreated metal surfaces to begin the corrosion process. This can include inside the cylinders, brake drums/disks, exhausts and the inside of your cars’ chassis. More advanced dehumidifiers have in-built humidistats to ensure that the air does not become too dry or too wet by turning the machines on and off as required. The Windrush Car Storage Chosen Method At Windrush Car Storage we have chosen to dehumidify all our buildings with dehumidifiers which monitor and maintain a target RH of 55%. As the ultimate level of protection we then offer to place vehicles inside AirChambers which then offer the ultimate protection for any vehicle in storage by filtering any dust particles out of the air before it enters the AirChamber. From everyday, to prestige and classic car storage, Windrush can provide you with a state-of-the-art, professional and passion driven service for all your car storage needs.
  • fuel-tips-for-car-storage-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale
    3 Minute Read

    Fuel Tips For Long Term Car Storage

    Read Article
    Fuel smart and you’ll keep your vehicle healthy during long term car storage. Here’s the expert advice your tank will thank you for. Squeeze pump. Swipe card. Filling up isn’t exactly rocket science – but when you place your vehicle in long term car storage, the rules are a little different. Left in an inactive car for longer periods, unused fuel can cause a host of mechanical issues. But whether you bring your vehicle to Windrush for specialist long term car storage – or follow the advice below before resting your vehicle at home – we’ll keep you ticking over. The Problem When it’s kept too long in an enclosed container like your vehicle’s tank or engine, fuel starts to degrade. The octane content reduces, and the petrol becomes stale, leading to blockages within the fuel lines, fuel pump and tank. Diesel vehicles suffer from a similar problem called waxing. And while most fuel contains additives to slow this process down, over a period of time these additives will themselves deteriorate. Meanwhile, fuel refiners are gradually increasing the ethanol levels in their product. True, ethanol blended into fuel is better for the environment. But for the car enthusiast whose vehicle sits unused for long periods, it’s less desirable, reducing fuel stability, causing metal corrosion within fuel systems, as well as hardening rubber fuel lines and plastic components like floats, seals and diaphragms. Add to that, ethanol is hydroscopic, so the water it absorbs will sink to the bottom of the fuel tank, causing rough running and corrosion in fuel systems. Thankfully, this is less of an issue in dehumidified facilities, like Windrush’s long term car storage locations in London and the Cotswolds. Four Fuelling Solutions Before you take your car off the road, it’s worth deciding how you plan to keep your fuel fresh and your vehicle functional. In our experience, these are the four most effective tactics before you book long term car storage. One of the most straightforward methods is to simply leave a small amount of fuel in your vehicle’s tank and add a little fresh fuel to this every few months. This will refresh the fuel in the tank and stop it deteriorating. Another effective approach is to fully fill the tank with high octane fuel. This larger volume of premium fuel will degrade much slower over time than a small amount of low-quality fuel left at the bottom of the tank. When you fill the fuel tank, also add a fuel stabilizer, to stop it degrading and contaminating the tank, injectors and more. Be sure to choose the best fuel stabilizer for car storage and use it at optimum dilution: that way, you could protect your vehicle for up to two years (though it’s not advised to leave the same fuel in your tank for more than a few years). For the ultimate preservation of a vehicle’s fuel system, use a non-ethanol fuel. This fuel type is not widely available, and can usually only be purchased as racing fuel at a high price per litre. But non-ethanol fuel is doubly effective, as it’s usually high octane rated, too, which will also significantly slow down the degrading process. The Windrush Difference From the ideal fuel brands to the best fuel stabilizer for car storage, when you choose Windrush, we’ll assess the unique requirements of your vehicle and decide on the best approach. It’s all part of a complete classic car storage solution that sets us apart. After a thorough twelve-step induction process – including a full fluid checkover – we’ll settle your car in its own dehumidified, climate-controlled indoor storage bay, maintained with 24/7 security, twice-daily checks, weekly battery and drip tray inspections, plus an expert maintenance checkover every 60 days. To discover more about Windrush long term car storage, get in touch today.
  • the-windrush-guide-to-e5-e10-and-ethanol-free-fuel-main-original-1.jpeg?w=1024&h=681&scale
    1 Minute Read

    The Windrush Guide To E5, E10 and Ethanol-Free Fuel

    Read Article
    With varying ethanol levels in modern fuel impacting everything from performance to corrosion, it’s worth learning a little more about what comes out of the pump. As we move closer to the UK’s adoption of ethanol-rich E10 in September, here’s what you need to know about fuelling for everyday driving and long term car storage. What are E5 & E10 fuels? Fill up on a UK forecourt today and, chances are, you’ll be putting E5 into the tank. E5’s name comes from the fact that it contains up to 5% bio-ethanol – a figure that will rise to 10% in the E10 fuel set to be rolled out across the UK from September. It’s hard to fault the government’s logic: that additional 5% ethanol could cut CO2 emissions by 750,000 tonnes/year (equivalent to 350,000 cars) and give the UK a fighting chance of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050. For motorists, however, E10 is contentious – even the RAC has advised owners of any car built before 2002 to avoid it or risk mechanical damage. Why could E10 damage my classic car? It’s all down to that double dose of ethanol. Ethanol is hygroscopic: it attracts water and absorbs moisture from the air, causing condensation and, in the long-term, the corrosion of car parts like carburettors, fuel lines and fuel tanks. To compound the problem, ethanol is a solvent, so over time it will damage any component made of plastic, rubber or fibreglass. Modern fuel-injected cars have fuel systems designed to process E10, which has been a fixture in European countries like Germany since 2011. But for historic vehicles, the added ethanol in the blend spells potential damage, especially if you put it into long term car storage without precautions. At Windrush, preventing fuel-related mechanical damage is a key part of our long term car storage programme. Here are four fuelling solutions to get familiar with. How does the long-term performance of different fuels compare? As a general rule of thumb, old fuel doesn’t combust as readily as fresh. On the road, a lack of power following long term car storage is the telltale symptom of degraded fuel, and this explains why classics that have been off the road a long time will often only run on choke/blipping of throttle. But the blend makes a big difference in how well your fuel lasts. In independent tests, non-ethanol fuel has been shown to stay more flammable over extended periods. Meanwhile, the RAC has referred to reports that claim E10 is less stable, which can make a vehicle with E10 in the tank particularly difficult to start following long term car storage. Can fuel stabilisers improve fuel performance? In a recent video by the YouTube channel Project Farm, presenter Todd Osgood ran a series of tests that suggested fuel stabilisers aren’t the silver bullet you might think. He acknowledged that when an additive was added to E10, an aluminium part left to soak in the blend corroded less than it did in standard E10 (although there was still some damage). But he also found that adding stabiliser to E10 didn’t stop it degrading. By contrast, with non-ethanol fuel, there was less evaporation, greater lifespan and no hint of parts corrosion (regardless of whether stabiliser was added or not). “If you’re using non-ethanol fuel,” concluded Osgood, “your carburettor is safe from the type of corrosion that ethanol causes.” What’s the best fuelling solution? It’s worth remembering that E10 is not the only option. E5 is likely to remain on UK forecourts for another five years, but even better for owners of historic cars could be investigating ethanol-free fuels. At the time of writing, there is no requirement for ethanol to be included in super unleaded (97/99) grade petrol, so if you’re driving a cherished older vehicle (or putting one into long term car storage), consider a switch to the UK’s only ethanol-free fuels, Esso Synergy Supreme+ Unleaded 97 and Synergy Supreme+ 99. Taking a long-term view, we’d advise that any car with fuel held in the tank for over three years should be drained and replaced with ethanol-free petrol. Optimal fuelling is just one element of Windrush’s long term car storage in Central London and the Cotswolds. To find out more, email us on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk.
  • target-environment-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale
    3 Minute Read

    Target Environment

    Read Article
    Due to the multitude of different materials present in any car, whether it be a classic, vintage or modern vehicle, there is a very specific environment in which vehicles should be stored to maintain condition. Moisture is the cause of rust and mould and it is this which needs to be managed. At Windrush Car Storage we have spent (and spend) great deal of time researching the different opinions and ‘best practice’ for the storing your pride and joy in the best possible environment. In summary there are several options: Heating Whilst we may believe this is going to be ‘good’ for your pride and joy, there are several drawbacks. Firstly it’s expensive, how many of our garages are insulated? This means that the heater will be going a lot of time, with a lot of the heat straight out of the roof and walls. Secondly the heat has to come from somewhere. This usually means that the method of doing this has introduced a fire risk, not ideal. Finally, warm air does not necessarily mean dry air. By heating the air the amount of moisture it can hold actually rises. If you brought your vehicle out of the cold into your nice warm garage, condensation would immediately form on all of the surfaces (similar to taking a milk bottle out of the fridge and into the warmer air of your kitchen). Further information on this topic can be found by clicking here. Ventilation For air to form condensation it needs to be still. (On a windy cold night you’ll never find condensation on your lawn whereas on a cold, still night you will!) By keeping the air moving in your garage it is possible to prevent condensation forming. The downside of this is that the air can still be laden with moisture and wherever the air is allowed to become still (inside the engine bay, exhaust, interior etc) condensation can form starting the rusting or mould process. Plastic Enclosures The next step on from ventilating the whole garage is to place the vehicle inside a purpose built enclosure a little larger than the vehicle where powerful fans draw in air through filters to remove any dust particles and then circulate the air around the vehicle. Several manufacturers supply systems that enclose the car completely in a plastic ‘bubble.’ Advantages are that 99% of dust is filtered out and air is continually being moved by fans to prevent condensation forming. These also have the additional benefit of preventing any objects accidentally coming into contact with the bodywork. The best in our opinion have an internal supporting framework, such as the Airflow AirChamber. Dehumidification The preferred method of removing moisture from the air and regarded as ‘best practice’ in the vehicle storage industry is by dehumidifying the storage environment. Dehumidifying allows vehicles stored in a garage to remain condensation and corrosion free. Units reduce and then maintain the humidity. It is important not to dry the air too much as a relative humidity (RH) drier than 55% may dry any wood (dashboards) or leather too much, causing them to warp and crack. Anything ‘wetter’ than a RH of 55% will allow exposed, untreated metal surfaces to begin the corrosion process. This can include inside the cylinders, brake drums/disks, exhausts and the inside of your cars’ chassis. More advanced dehumidifiers have in-built humidistats to ensure that the air does not become too dry or too wet by turning the machines on and off as required. The Windrush Car Storage Chosen Method At Windrush Car Storage we have chosen to dehumidify all our buildings with dehumidifiers which monitor and maintain a target RH of 55%. As the ultimate level of protection we then offer to place vehicles inside AirChambers which then offer the ultimate protection for any vehicle in storage by filtering any dust particles out of the air before it enters the AirChamber. From everyday, to prestige and classic car storage, Windrush can provide you with a state-of-the-art, professional and passion driven service for all your car storage needs.
Enquire Today
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