7 Minute Read

Anyone for (Volkswagen) Golf?

Posted by - Tim Earnshaw on 31 January 2024
Categories: Classic car storage

As the humble hatch turns 50, Windrush takes a look back at the hits and misses of a classic car in the making.

It is likely that everyone reading this has a story to tell about a Volkswagen Golf. Maybe you owned one? Perhaps someone in your family did? Whatever the tale, we all know the Golf intimately and, at some stage in life, it is highly-likely all of us have lusted after a GTi model.

Interestingly, everyone has a favourite model, and it isn’t always the one favoured by the press. The way the Golf gets under our skin is often down to the model we wanted as children, the one you saw Clarkson drive on 'Top Gear' or even the one that was newest when you started your driving career. Here we take an unbiased look at every generation: we will leave you to judge which is best.

Golf Mk1 1974-1983

6754-TheGolfGTIMkI-1-1024x657

Believe it or not, the Golf followed the Beetle and the front-engined, front-wheel-drive and hatchback styling couldn’t have been more different. Offered in various forms including a diesel, a cabriolet and, of course, a GTi, the first generation Golf had a model for everyone. But, as we are all enthusiasts, let’s look more closely at that GTi. Using a 1.6 engine lifted from an Audi 80, it had 57% more power than the 1.5 already fitted to the Golf, giving it a top speed of 113mph and a 0-60 time of 9 seconds. While that was fast for the time, it was the handling, speed and practicality as a package that saw the Hot Hatch generation begin, and ensured the Mk1 GTi would become an icon in the motoring world and a regular in classic car storage facilities.

Golf Mk2 1983-1991

30576-GolfGTIMkII-1024x683

This Golf was larger, more complex, and better equipped that its predecessor but still retained a feeling of familiarity that captured the hearts of the world. By the end of 1990, more than 12 million VW Golfs had been built in total and, when production of the second generation drew to a close in 1991, a total of 6.3 million Mk2 Golfs had been assembled.

The Mk2 GTi came with a 1.8, 8-valve motor (112hp) and a 1.8 16-valve (139hp). Late model GTis had enhanced body styling, now known as the Big Bumper cars, a model still highly sought after today. By this time the Golf GTi was a hero of Pop Culture, favoured by city-slicker Yuppies and was the star of many celebrated commercials.

Golf Mk3 1991-1997

30615-GolfGTIMkIII-1024x683

The Mk3 Golf matured the much-loved hatch, but with that it lost a lot of its character. The dashboard wasn’t quite up to the quality expected and the overall feeling was one of averageness, where previous models had excelled. However, the Mk3 did continue the trend of fast Golfs with the new VR6 model with a 2.9 V6 upfront giving a top speed of 140mph and a 0-60 time of 7.4 seconds. The GTi was also offered, this time in 2.0 8v (115hp) and 16v (148hp) guises, but the increased weight and average dynamics of the Mk3 meant this generation of GTi was more miss than hit.

Golf Mk4 1997-2003

30631-GolfGTIMkIV.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale

Volkswagen stepped up with the Mk4. A supremely high-quality interior, exceptional levels of equipment and sophisticated looks saw the Golf back on par. Even today the Mk4 remains a common sight, testament to their exceptional build quality and performance, models still command high prices. Performance Mk4 Golfs come in at both ends of the spectrum. The first GTi revealed was a 2.0 with a lowly 115hp and not much sporting prowess, and some wondered if the Golf GTi was dead. But, then came the 1.8 Turbo GTi with 150hp and nigh on 140mph performance. The wonderful R32 was also launched, with 4wd and a whopping 3.2 V6 under the bonnet. Such a large motor meant 241hp, 155mph top speed and just 6 seconds to 60. Finally, there was a 25th Anniversary GTi with every option included and a 180hp, turbocharged 1.8 engine.

Golf Mk5 2003-2008

30659-GolfGTIMkV-1024x683

The Mk5 was a new high-point for the Golf, with advanced construction, technically-impressive engines, and a mature ride for the class. The new Golf may not have had the hewn-from-granite interior of the Mk4, but it made up for it in every other aspect. The GTi was also in for high praise, with a boisterous 2.0 turbo engine producing 197hp. It was celebrated for having the brilliance of the Mk1 and Mk2 but with proper usability, making it one of the most usable performance cars of its time. The interior had a tartan cloth, again a hark back to the Mk1 GTi and the chassis offered a softer ride than the overly harsh competitors which allowed the driver to feel the road when pushing on, while also being able to enjoy the daily grind in relative comfort. Also worthy of note is the complex 1.4 TSi engines offered in this generation – supercharged and turbocharged to allow the use of a smaller capacity engine to provide cleaner emissions and great performance.

Golf Mk6 2008-2012

30684-GolfGTIMkVI-1024x683

The Mk6 was unusual in that it was only produced for four years, largely because it was more of a re-worked Mk5 than a completely new model. That said, it still won top honours at the 2019 World Car of the Year awards. Crash safety was also at the top of the class, winning 5-stars in the Euro NCAP crash tests. The Mk6 was also the first time the Golf R was seen, a car that marked the end of the 6-cylinder fast Golf with its 2.0 4-cylinder turbocharged engine. But we needn’t have worried, as this motor offered a mighty 266hp, 20hp more than in the Mk4 3.2 R32. 0-60 took just 5.5 seconds, 4wd kept that power in check and the latest DSG gearbox was praised for its fast changes and enthusiast nature. A GTi was also offered at this time with a version of the 2.0 turbo engine producing 210hp (56 less than the R) but still offering 146mph and a 0-60 time of 6.9 seconds. If you wanted to be Fast and Frugal the Golf GTD may be for you. It is plenty fast enough, but with the added bonus of diesel economy (a claimed 44mpg).

Golf Mk7 2012-2020

30736-GolfGTIMkVIIPerformance.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale

The Mk7 was all about economy (initially), weighing a useful 100kg less than the Mk6 and with more efficient engines, the new Golf offered reduced emissions with greater economy. The R continued, too, this time with a huge 300hp and great lease deals at the time (on both the hatch and estate variants) saw these fly out of the showrooms, creating a waiting list for new cars.

The GTi was well catered for, too with the GTi, the GTi Performance Pack and the GTi Clubsport and Clubsport S offered on the Mk7 platform. The Performance Pack was an option on the standard GTi and gave an extra 15hp (up to 242hp) and 15nm of torque as well as bigger brakes, limited slip differential and a new interior display. The Clubsport and Clubsport S was something else altogether. The S was called the 911 GT3 of GTis, posted a 7.47 lap of the Nurburgring, and was rare with only 150 examples coming to the UK. 306hp. 6-speed manual, bespoke dampers and a host of other additions make this a very special Golf. Note: An updated Golf 7.5 launched in 2013 with some revisions.

Golf Mk8 2020-date

30948-GolfGTIClubsport45.jpg?w=1024&h=683&scale

Something we haven’t touched on yet is the demise of actual buttons in the Golf, in favour of touchscreens. The Mk8 Golf received a lot of negative comments from press and owners alike, who bemoaned the fact simple tasks (such as adjusting the heating) was now deep in a digital menu and hard to navigate. In fact, many say the 7.5 was peak Golf and the latest is a step backwards. Other VW models are making a return to buttons for some tasks, so perhaps the Mk9 Golf will do the same. For now, let us tell you about the Mk8 R and GTi. The GTi remains one of the best usable performance cars on sale with 242hp, but now the GTi is only available as a 5-door only, so no more 3-door GTi. The Clubsport remains available, as does the R, with 315hp and 420nm of torque. Press reviews praise all for their performance but warn of poor infotainment and low-quality materials in the cabin.

As we conclude this piece, Volkswagen has just announced the Golf Mk8.5. The GTi is a 5-door, DSG only, and the entire range gets revised styling. More power has been eked out of the hybrids, and (for the ICE fans) two petrol and two diesel options are available at launch. Also worth celebrating is the option of a 6-speed manual across the range, but not on the GTi. Yet. No word from VW either on the return (or otherwise) of good old-fashioned dashboard buttons…

A classic car deserves classic car storage

It is reported that over 35million Golfs have been built since launching 50 years ago, and 2.3million of those were GTis. Volkswagen also claim over 300,000 R models have been sold since launch. Whatever model is your favourite, the Golf is a genuine automotive icon, accepted and loved by all and long may that continue…but please give us the buttons back!

If you are a Golf enthusiast but just don’t have anywhere to store your collection, Windrush Car Storage offers state-of-the-art facilities for classic car collectors. Our classic car storage centres in London and the Cotswolds allow you keep your classic car collection safe and secure while you continue to indulge your hobby!

Drop the Windrush team an email to ask about our electric and classic car storage service. We’re ready to help you on info@windrushcarstorage.co.uk

Get in touch
Call Cotswolds +44 (0) 1451 821 008
Call London +44 (0) 207 458 4418
EV1
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Where should I store my car?

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Whether looking for a car storage solution for a couple of months or looking for something more permanent,…
Read Article
Whether looking for a car storage solution for a couple of months or looking for something more permanent, or just looking for a company offering expert classic car storage for your pride and joy, we have written this article to help you choose the right car storage facility to suit your needs. Two basic considerations need to be contemplated when looking to store your car. Are you looking for Indoor or Outdoor car storage? Storing your vehicle outdoors will undoubtedly be less expensive than indoor storage. Your vehicle will be in the open, exposed to nature’s elements, which if left unchecked could lead to paint fade from the sun’s UV rays, mouldy Interiors, bodywork to rust and mechanical components to seize – not things any car owner would like to happen. Storing your vehicle indoors is usually kinder to a vehicle than outdoors. An indoor, dehumidified facility will provide the ideal climate to preserve and protect your pride and joy, and is available for short term or long term car storage. However there are several more considerations now to consider. There are specialist companies out there who are offering car storage. As with any business, the quality of service you and your vehicle are likely to receive will vary widely. It therefore pays to do your research and shop around. There may be different aspects that appeal to you rather than cost and distance a particular company is from you. Starting the search for a car storage company. Three main areas to investigate: Word of mouth: Ask around, you may have friends who have used a similar service or local automotive specialists who can recommend a reputable company. Motoring magazines: These often contain a number of specialist companies, who you will need to call for more information. Internet search engines: Websites will contain more information than magazine advertisements and should describe in detail their services, pricing and photographs of what the storage environment is like. Once you have narrowed the search to a selection of car storage companies there are several factors that will influence your decision. Consider each of these carefully. Pricing Ask what the storage rate is. There may be different levels of storage available, and options for short term and long term car storage, and maybe something extra special from classic car storage. It should be clear what is included, what is not and what additional services are offered. Washing your vehicle prior to storage and connecting to battery conditioners are important, but could come as a surprise when not included in the price. Staff How busy are they? Generally car storage companies work with a small team of staff and rely on potential and existing clients to make appointments. This allows them to organise their time and yours. This will, however, also mean that they may not be able to see you right away. A good storage company should make the effort to fit you in within a few days notice. Remember, if they cannot see you right away it is probably because they are occupied with existing clients – proof that other people believe in their service. Passion Is car storage their full time profession, a part time business or a sideline business? Perhaps this is the best indicator of quality of service. Ask if anyone connected with the business has a car of their own in storage. This will generally mean they have an enthusiasm for you and your vehicle and will not have taken short cuts when designing the facility or service.
the-top-10-classic-cars-from-the-70s-main-original-1.jpg?w=1024&h=854&scale
1 Minute Read

The Top 10 Classic Cars From The…

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We’ve hosted some of the greatest models of the ’70s at Windrush’s classic car storage in central London…
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We’ve hosted some of the greatest models of the ’70s at Windrush’s classic car storage in central London and the Cotswolds. From the scissor-doored cool of the Lamborghini Countach to the urban grit of the Ford Capri, here are ten favourites from a true golden age of motoring. Lamborghini Countach Model run: 1974-1990 Launch spec: 3.9-litre V12 engine, 375HP, 186MPH top speed What made it special: The space-age styling of the Italian design house Bertone and the first scissor doors ever seen on a production car. Was this the first supercar? The debate rages on… Lotus Esprit Model run: 1976-2004 Launch spec: 907 4-cylinder engine, 160HP, 133MPH top speed What made it special: Giorgetto Giugiaro’s dramatic polygonal wedge design, so futuristic it was nicknamed ‘the silver car’. James Bond drove one underwater in The Spy Who Loved Me. Aston Martin Vantage Model run: 1977-1989 Launch spec: 5.3-litre V8, 390BHP, 170MPH top speed What made it special: Style and pace that saw the Vantage dubbed Britain’s first supercar – and adopted by Bond in 1987’s The Living Daylights. The Vantage name still excites drivers to this day and the name remains in production. Porsche 911 Turbo Model run: 1975-1977 Launch spec: 3.0-litre engine, 260HP, 155MPH top speed What made it special: The original turbocharged 911, leaving its normally aspirated older brother on the starting line. The Porsche Turbo is, arguably, the most famous of all supercars, and continues to command respect. Ferrari 308 GTB Model run: 1975-1985 Launch spec: V8 mid-engined, 252BHP, 157MPH top speed What made it special: Revolutionary fibreglass body and the spiritual forefather of Ferrari’s classics to come. Star status confirmed as the company car of TV detective Magnum P.I. BMW 3.0CSL Model run: 1972-1977 Launch spec: 3-litre 6-cylinder engine, 197BHP, 133MPH top speed What made it special: Lightweight, aerodynamic styling that helped win the European Touring Car Championship six times. Known as ‘The Batmobile’ the 3.0 CSL is one of BMWs finest moments. Citroën SM Model run: 1970-1975 Launch spec: 2.7-litre V6 engine, 178 BHP, 142MPH top speed What made it special: Head-turning Gallic style courtesy of Citroën’s chief designer Robert Opron, fused with high performance via a Maserati V6. Très chic. Range Rover Model run: 1970-1994 Launch spec: 3.5-litre V8 engine, 130BHP, 96MPH top speed What made it special: Billed as ‘a car for all reasons’, pairing the Land Rover’s go-anywhere 4×4 traction with unprecedented sophistication about town. Remains the king of luxury off-roaders. Mercedes Benz-450SEL 6.9 Model run: 1975-1981 Launch spec: 6.8-litre V8, 286BHP, 140MPH top speed What made it special: The biggest engine of any non-US postwar production car, along with handling that allowed it to be “tossed it about like a Mini” (in the words of motoring journalist David E. Davis). Star of the famous car chase in the film Ronin. Ford Capri MkI Model run: 1969-1986 Launch spec: 1.3-litre Ford Kent engine, 72BHP, 100MPH top speed What made it special: Strictly speaking, the MkI was launched in 1969, but nothing bottles the ’70s vibe better. No wonder the iconic ’78 3.0S model driven by Bodie in The Professionals went for a world-record £55,000 at auction… Choose Windrush for your classic car storage Whether you’re driving one of these icons – or anything else – we’re proud to offer the complete classic car storage solution at Windrush. Following a thorough twelve-step induction, we’ll settle your vehicle in a dehumidified, climate-controlled indoor storage bay, maintained with 24/7 security, twice-daily checks and weekly battery and drip tray inspections. Plus, every 60 days, we’ll give your car an expert maintenance checkover and run it up to temperature on our internal rolling road. Whether you’re based in the countryside, or looking for classic car storage in London, your historic vehicle couldn’t be in better hands. To discover more about Windrush’s classic car storage, get in touch.
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The Most Understated Classic Cars

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Meet the sophisticated models that don’t have to shout to be noticed – and discover how classic car storage can keep them purring It’s a thrill to turn heads in a red-hot Testarossa or attract cinephiles with a DeLorean straight from the reels of Back To The Future. But you’ll get a whole different kind of attention when you take the wheel of a more understated classic car. Sophistication is an elusive quality, but you’ll know it when you see it – and the five models we’ve hand-picked below have it in spades. They might be light on flash, but a more subtle classic car can still be a great investment. Hunt down the right example, and keep it in optimum condition with dedicated classic car storage, and you’ll get both the pleasures of ownership and the satisfaction of a healthy profit. Here are five to shortlist. Jaguar E-Type When Enzo Ferrari himself describes a model as “the most beautiful car ever made”, you know it’s worthy of your attention. Produced between 1961 and 1975, this British icon is perhaps the ultimate fusion of styling and performance, drawing admiring glances with its undulating curves, but squaring up to the supercars with a 150mph top speed. If you’re lucky enough to secure your own slice of British motoring folklore, protect its value with classic car storage, and pass it on to the next generation. BMW 507 Launched in 1956 – and discontinued just three years later – the history books suggest the BMW 507 didn’t exactly set the world alight. Commercial misfire it may have been, but this stunner has grown into a slow-burn cult hero, with its sweeping contours now a head-turning sight in a world of boxy speedsters. Just remember that with rarity comes risk – especially in the big city – so when you’re not behind the wheel, be sure to keep this historic model in optimum condition with dedicated classic car storage. Aston Martin DB4 Of course, the more-celebrated DB5 is a stunner, but Bond fans have driven up prices and pushed that model towards cliché. If you’re wondering what classic car to buy for investment, consider instead the flagship DB5’s older brother from 1958, with a chassis created under the eye of chief engineer Harold Beach and Milan-based firm Touring dreaming up that curvaceous body. Kept in mint condition with specialist classic car storage, the DB4 is a lesser-known gem that should hold its value. Alfa Romeo Spider Duetto Everybody loves a Ferrari, but when it comes to understated Italian chic, the 26-year production run of the Spider Duetto shows just how right Alfa Romeo got it. Since the final Spider rolled off the line in 1993, it’s been a discerning collector’s choice, well worth keeping in optimum condition with specialist classic car storage, to maintain both bodywork and mechanics. Volvo PS1800 If you associate Volvo with boxy-but-practical family estates, you’ve obviously never seen the PS1800. In the ’60s, this svelte two-seater was Roger Moore’s ride of choice for The Saint, and today the vibe is more weekend break and coastal run than overladen family holiday. Of course, with vehicles of this vintage, it’s vital to choose classic car storage experts who understand the quirks of your machine and give it the specialist attention to suit. For all of these classics – and any other vehicle with financial or sentimental value – Windrush’s classic car storage is a must. We give every vehicle the personal touch, with a classic car storage solution that starts with a twelve-step induction process. Once complete, we’ll treat your car to an individual dehumidified, climate-controlled indoor storage bay, with 24/7 security, twice-daily checks, plus weekly battery and drip tray inspections. And if you’ve come to us for long-term car storage, we’ll even carry out a deep maintenance checkover every 60 days. To keep your pride and joy in peak condition – trust Windrush.  To discover how Windrush classic car storage could protect your investment, get in touch today.
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    Where should I store my car?

    Read Article
    Whether looking for a car storage solution for a couple of months or looking for something more permanent, or just looking for a company offering expert classic car storage for your pride and joy, we have written this article to help you choose the right car storage facility to suit your needs. Two basic considerations need to be contemplated when looking to store your car. Are you looking for Indoor or Outdoor car storage? Storing your vehicle outdoors will undoubtedly be less expensive than indoor storage. Your vehicle will be in the open, exposed to nature’s elements, which if left unchecked could lead to paint fade from the sun’s UV rays, mouldy Interiors, bodywork to rust and mechanical components to seize – not things any car owner would like to happen. Storing your vehicle indoors is usually kinder to a vehicle than outdoors. An indoor, dehumidified facility will provide the ideal climate to preserve and protect your pride and joy, and is available for short term or long term car storage. However there are several more considerations now to consider. There are specialist companies out there who are offering car storage. As with any business, the quality of service you and your vehicle are likely to receive will vary widely. It therefore pays to do your research and shop around. There may be different aspects that appeal to you rather than cost and distance a particular company is from you. Starting the search for a car storage company. Three main areas to investigate: Word of mouth: Ask around, you may have friends who have used a similar service or local automotive specialists who can recommend a reputable company. Motoring magazines: These often contain a number of specialist companies, who you will need to call for more information. Internet search engines: Websites will contain more information than magazine advertisements and should describe in detail their services, pricing and photographs of what the storage environment is like. Once you have narrowed the search to a selection of car storage companies there are several factors that will influence your decision. Consider each of these carefully. Pricing Ask what the storage rate is. There may be different levels of storage available, and options for short term and long term car storage, and maybe something extra special from classic car storage. It should be clear what is included, what is not and what additional services are offered. Washing your vehicle prior to storage and connecting to battery conditioners are important, but could come as a surprise when not included in the price. Staff How busy are they? Generally car storage companies work with a small team of staff and rely on potential and existing clients to make appointments. This allows them to organise their time and yours. This will, however, also mean that they may not be able to see you right away. A good storage company should make the effort to fit you in within a few days notice. Remember, if they cannot see you right away it is probably because they are occupied with existing clients – proof that other people believe in their service. Passion Is car storage their full time profession, a part time business or a sideline business? Perhaps this is the best indicator of quality of service. Ask if anyone connected with the business has a car of their own in storage. This will generally mean they have an enthusiasm for you and your vehicle and will not have taken short cuts when designing the facility or service.
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    The Top 10 Classic Cars From The ’70s

    Read Article
    We’ve hosted some of the greatest models of the ’70s at Windrush’s classic car storage in central London and the Cotswolds. From the scissor-doored cool of the Lamborghini Countach to the urban grit of the Ford Capri, here are ten favourites from a true golden age of motoring. Lamborghini Countach Model run: 1974-1990 Launch spec: 3.9-litre V12 engine, 375HP, 186MPH top speed What made it special: The space-age styling of the Italian design house Bertone and the first scissor doors ever seen on a production car. Was this the first supercar? The debate rages on… Lotus Esprit Model run: 1976-2004 Launch spec: 907 4-cylinder engine, 160HP, 133MPH top speed What made it special: Giorgetto Giugiaro’s dramatic polygonal wedge design, so futuristic it was nicknamed ‘the silver car’. James Bond drove one underwater in The Spy Who Loved Me. Aston Martin Vantage Model run: 1977-1989 Launch spec: 5.3-litre V8, 390BHP, 170MPH top speed What made it special: Style and pace that saw the Vantage dubbed Britain’s first supercar – and adopted by Bond in 1987’s The Living Daylights. The Vantage name still excites drivers to this day and the name remains in production. Porsche 911 Turbo Model run: 1975-1977 Launch spec: 3.0-litre engine, 260HP, 155MPH top speed What made it special: The original turbocharged 911, leaving its normally aspirated older brother on the starting line. The Porsche Turbo is, arguably, the most famous of all supercars, and continues to command respect. Ferrari 308 GTB Model run: 1975-1985 Launch spec: V8 mid-engined, 252BHP, 157MPH top speed What made it special: Revolutionary fibreglass body and the spiritual forefather of Ferrari’s classics to come. Star status confirmed as the company car of TV detective Magnum P.I. BMW 3.0CSL Model run: 1972-1977 Launch spec: 3-litre 6-cylinder engine, 197BHP, 133MPH top speed What made it special: Lightweight, aerodynamic styling that helped win the European Touring Car Championship six times. Known as ‘The Batmobile’ the 3.0 CSL is one of BMWs finest moments. Citroën SM Model run: 1970-1975 Launch spec: 2.7-litre V6 engine, 178 BHP, 142MPH top speed What made it special: Head-turning Gallic style courtesy of Citroën’s chief designer Robert Opron, fused with high performance via a Maserati V6. Très chic. Range Rover Model run: 1970-1994 Launch spec: 3.5-litre V8 engine, 130BHP, 96MPH top speed What made it special: Billed as ‘a car for all reasons’, pairing the Land Rover’s go-anywhere 4×4 traction with unprecedented sophistication about town. Remains the king of luxury off-roaders. Mercedes Benz-450SEL 6.9 Model run: 1975-1981 Launch spec: 6.8-litre V8, 286BHP, 140MPH top speed What made it special: The biggest engine of any non-US postwar production car, along with handling that allowed it to be “tossed it about like a Mini” (in the words of motoring journalist David E. Davis). Star of the famous car chase in the film Ronin. Ford Capri MkI Model run: 1969-1986 Launch spec: 1.3-litre Ford Kent engine, 72BHP, 100MPH top speed What made it special: Strictly speaking, the MkI was launched in 1969, but nothing bottles the ’70s vibe better. No wonder the iconic ’78 3.0S model driven by Bodie in The Professionals went for a world-record £55,000 at auction… Choose Windrush for your classic car storage Whether you’re driving one of these icons – or anything else – we’re proud to offer the complete classic car storage solution at Windrush. Following a thorough twelve-step induction, we’ll settle your vehicle in a dehumidified, climate-controlled indoor storage bay, maintained with 24/7 security, twice-daily checks and weekly battery and drip tray inspections. Plus, every 60 days, we’ll give your car an expert maintenance checkover and run it up to temperature on our internal rolling road. Whether you’re based in the countryside, or looking for classic car storage in London, your historic vehicle couldn’t be in better hands. To discover more about Windrush’s classic car storage, get in touch.
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    The Most Understated Classic Cars

    Read Article
    Meet the sophisticated models that don’t have to shout to be noticed – and discover how classic car storage can keep them purring It’s a thrill to turn heads in a red-hot Testarossa or attract cinephiles with a DeLorean straight from the reels of Back To The Future. But you’ll get a whole different kind of attention when you take the wheel of a more understated classic car. Sophistication is an elusive quality, but you’ll know it when you see it – and the five models we’ve hand-picked below have it in spades. They might be light on flash, but a more subtle classic car can still be a great investment. Hunt down the right example, and keep it in optimum condition with dedicated classic car storage, and you’ll get both the pleasures of ownership and the satisfaction of a healthy profit. Here are five to shortlist. Jaguar E-Type When Enzo Ferrari himself describes a model as “the most beautiful car ever made”, you know it’s worthy of your attention. Produced between 1961 and 1975, this British icon is perhaps the ultimate fusion of styling and performance, drawing admiring glances with its undulating curves, but squaring up to the supercars with a 150mph top speed. If you’re lucky enough to secure your own slice of British motoring folklore, protect its value with classic car storage, and pass it on to the next generation. BMW 507 Launched in 1956 – and discontinued just three years later – the history books suggest the BMW 507 didn’t exactly set the world alight. Commercial misfire it may have been, but this stunner has grown into a slow-burn cult hero, with its sweeping contours now a head-turning sight in a world of boxy speedsters. Just remember that with rarity comes risk – especially in the big city – so when you’re not behind the wheel, be sure to keep this historic model in optimum condition with dedicated classic car storage. Aston Martin DB4 Of course, the more-celebrated DB5 is a stunner, but Bond fans have driven up prices and pushed that model towards cliché. If you’re wondering what classic car to buy for investment, consider instead the flagship DB5’s older brother from 1958, with a chassis created under the eye of chief engineer Harold Beach and Milan-based firm Touring dreaming up that curvaceous body. Kept in mint condition with specialist classic car storage, the DB4 is a lesser-known gem that should hold its value. Alfa Romeo Spider Duetto Everybody loves a Ferrari, but when it comes to understated Italian chic, the 26-year production run of the Spider Duetto shows just how right Alfa Romeo got it. Since the final Spider rolled off the line in 1993, it’s been a discerning collector’s choice, well worth keeping in optimum condition with specialist classic car storage, to maintain both bodywork and mechanics. Volvo PS1800 If you associate Volvo with boxy-but-practical family estates, you’ve obviously never seen the PS1800. In the ’60s, this svelte two-seater was Roger Moore’s ride of choice for The Saint, and today the vibe is more weekend break and coastal run than overladen family holiday. Of course, with vehicles of this vintage, it’s vital to choose classic car storage experts who understand the quirks of your machine and give it the specialist attention to suit. For all of these classics – and any other vehicle with financial or sentimental value – Windrush’s classic car storage is a must. We give every vehicle the personal touch, with a classic car storage solution that starts with a twelve-step induction process. Once complete, we’ll treat your car to an individual dehumidified, climate-controlled indoor storage bay, with 24/7 security, twice-daily checks, plus weekly battery and drip tray inspections. And if you’ve come to us for long-term car storage, we’ll even carry out a deep maintenance checkover every 60 days. To keep your pride and joy in peak condition – trust Windrush.  To discover how Windrush classic car storage could protect your investment, get in touch today.
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